Science

  • SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft successfully attaches to the ISS  SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft, which launched on Sunday and is filled with 5,500 pounds of supplies and experiment materials for the crew of the International Space Station has successfully docked. The Dragon craft had missed its first attempt at meeting up with the station, due to a GPS error. It’s the first time since 2012 that ...
  • Research heralds better and bidirectional brain-computer interfaces  A pair of studies, one from Stanford and another from the University of Geneva, exemplify the speed with which brain-computer interfaces are advancing; and while you won’t be using one instead of a mouse and keyboard any time soon, even in its nascent form the tech may prove transformative for the disabled. Read More ...
  • NASA found 7 “Earthlike” planets just under 40 light years away  NASA has discovered seven planets with Earth-like qualities orbiting a nearby star making them among the strongest candidates in the continued search for extraterrestrial life among  known exoplanets, or planets that exist outside of our own solar system. These new planets all inhabit another solar system which includes seven planets that have a relatively warm ...
  • Researchers devise method for regenerating hair cells to help reverse hearing loss  Damage to the approximately 15,000 hair cells per ear is a leading factor contributing to hearing loss. A new technology demonstrated by a team at MIT, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts Eye and Ear could help reverse some of that damage, mimicking some animals’ ability to regenerate the hair, potentially reversing hearing loss in ...
  • SpaceX successfully lands its first-stage Falcon 9 rocket at Cape Canaveral  Success all around for today’s SpaceX mission. The company successfully launched a Dragon spacecraft that is on its way to the International Space Station. SpaceX also successfully landed the first stage of its Falcon 9 rocket at Cape Canaveral. The weather was cloudy but it looks like it wasn’t enough to stop SpaceX from launching ...
  • Watch SpaceX’s second attempt for its ISS resupply mission live right here  Sunday seems like a fine day to launch a rocket into space. Yesterday, SpaceX rescheduled the CRS-10 mission. There was an issue with the the positioning of an engine nozzle that’s responsible for steering the rocket. At 9:39 AM ET (6:30 AM PT), SpaceX is set to launch its Falcon 9 rocket for good this ...
  • Ornithologists are using drones to eavesdrop on songbirds  When conservationists put drones to work in field research, they typically function as flying eyes that gather imagery of the habitat and wildlife below. Now, ornithologists from Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania are using drones as flying ears to monitor songbirds in the Appalachian Mountains. Results of their drone study were published in the peer-reviewed journal The ...
  • SpaceX’s CRS-10 ISS resupply mission rocket launch scrubbed, next window is Feb 19  Update: SpaceX aborted the launch with 13 seconds to go, citing the issue with the positioning of an engine nozzle that’s responsible for steering the rocket in the second stage as the cause. The company said it was exercising “an abundance of caution” in postponing the launch, but wanted to be absolutely sure. The next launch ...
  • Tokyo Institute of Technology taps Nvidia for Japan’s fastest AI supercomputer  Nvidia’s business is increasingly the business of artificial intelligence, and its latest partnership fits with that new role. The graphics processing maker is supplying the Tokyo Institute of Technology for the GPUs that will power its new AI supercomputer, which will be the fastest of its kind in Japan once completed. Nvidia Tesla P100 GPUs, ...
  • Havard-led woolly mammoth de-extinction project gets closer to reality  The woolly mammoth is long extinct, but it’s beginning to look like they might make a comeback – or a comeback of sorts, as a hybrid elephant genetically edited to display many mammoth traits. A team of Harvard researchers presented their progress in making this happen at the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s ...
  • LIFE puts beautiful people in space, then tries to kill them Ars talks with the science advisors from the film—plus, we’ve got an exclusive video. Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in ...
  • Semi-finalists named in the Shell Ocean Discovery XPrize  The Shell Oil-sponsored Ocean Discovery XPrize moves to the semi-finalist stage this week with 21 teams from 25 countries, including Canada, China, France, Germany, Ghana, India, Japan, New Zealand, Portugal, South Africa, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. Aimed at exploring and detecting chemical and biological systems at the depths of the ocean, the teams ...
  • Virtual nurse app Sense.ly raises $8 million from investors including the Mayo Clinic  San Francisco startup Sense.ly has raised $8 million in a Series B round of venture funding to bring its virtual nurse technology to clinics and patients of every kind. The company’s app helps physicians stay in touch with patients, and prevent readmission to the hospital. Chief Executive Officer and founder of Sense.ly, Adam Odessky describes ...
  • AncestryDNA clustered 770,000 genomes to find your family’s American immigration story  Immigration into the U.S. is a hot political topic right now, but, unless you’re Native American, pretty much everyone here has a family history involving some sort of immigration story. Now AncestryDNA, a consumer genetics subsidiary of the genealogy research site Ancestry.com, wants to help you know more about your family’s immigration journey. To do so, the ...
  • Cambridge is giving cancer the 3D VR treatment  It’s always good to hear that scientists are bringing the latest technology to the fight against cancer, but virtual reality doesn’t seem like an obvious addition to the arsenal. Yet it’s VR and 3D visualization that Cambridge University researchers are planning to explore under a multi-million pound grant. Read More Share ...
  • NASA’s concept Europa lander belongs on the cover of a sci-fi pulp  Long before any mission to another planet is undertaken, NASA and other space agencies commission reports on why and how we might want to go about it. The latest such report was issued this week regarding Jupiter’s moon Europa, one of the most interesting and mysterious bodies in the solar system — and among the ...
  • TSA knows its airport behavior detection program is ineffective ACLU: Documents in TSA’s files say program “is unscientific and unreliable.” Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to ...
  • Tiny chip looks deep inside your body with millimeter-wave radiation  Researchers at the University of California Irvine have created a chip for use in medical imaging and other applications that’s as powerful as it is tiny. The pint-size millimeter-wave radiator could lead to better scanning of tissues and organs, but may also work as part of our everyday wireless data ecosystem. Read More ...
  • This app uses spectral analysis to analyze objects and their makeup  Normally, if the creators of an app claimed that it could look inside things and tell you their constituent parts, I would tell you to go peddle your snake oil elsewhere. But this app is from veteran R&D group Fraunhofer — so it may very well be the real thing. Read More ...
  • Bat Bot is the biomimetic flying soft robot we deserve  If you’ve ever seen a bat in flight, you know how impressive their aerial acrobatics can be — so impressive that we have yet to successfully imitate it the way we have with locomotion or even bird flight. This impressive new flying robot is the best attempt yet, though it’s still a long way from ...
  • How Facebook plans to evaluate its quest for generalized artificial intelligence  One of the biggest misconceptions about artificial intelligence is the belief that today’s AIs possess generalized intelligence. We are really good at leveraging large datasets to accomplish specific tasks, but fall flat at replicating the breath of human intelligence. If we’re going to move towards generalized intelligence, Facebook wants to make sure we know how to… Read More ...
  • MIT researchers are using AI and wearables to detect conversational tone  For most, wearables are little more than pedometers – ways of gauging how much one’s moved during the day and, hopefully, challenging them to do more in the future. It’s one of the factors in the space’s seeming plateau of late. But a wrist full of sensors can do a heck of a lot more ...
  • MIT built a gel-based claw robot that can catch and release live fish  MIT’s latest robot looks a bit like one of those claw machines you find at the front of an arcade, only instead of metal, the claws are made of a clear, membranous substance. And instead of stuffed Minion dolls, they pick up live fish. But other than that, the principles are pretty similar. The robot’s limbs ...
  • Origami-inspired radiator from NASA could change shape to warm or cool tiny satellites  The devices we’re sending into space are getting smaller and lighter, which means there’s less room for bulky and static components. Flexibility and compactness are coming into vogue, and this prototype satellite radiator is inspired by that most compact and flexible of arts: origami. Read More Share this:Click to email this ...
  • SpaceX’s Hyperloop competition sees three companies run their pods  SpaceX hosted a hyperloop pod design test competition at its Hawthorne headquarters this past weekend, where student teams got the chance to run their pod designs in low-pressure environments in a test track for the first time. There were a numbe… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on ...
  • Rogue National Park Service Twitter account says it’s no longer run by government employees…but maybe it never was  The rogue government Twitter account, AltUSNatParkService, which claimed it was being run by current park rangers, says it has now handed off control of its Twitter account to “several activists and journalists who believe they can continue in the same spirit.” The move has led some to question if the account was, in fact, ever operated ...
  • EPA scientific studies must be vetted by administration before release  The Trump administration has told the EPA that its scientific work must pass through a political vetting process before being released, multiple sources indicate. Doug Erickson, head of Trump’s EPA transition team, has made it clear to NPR and the AP, among others, that “We’re taking a look at everything on a case-by-case basis, including ...
  • Your smartphone could soon be the first step for diagnosing skin cancer  If caught early, skin cancer isn’t particularly deadly. But unfortunately for many, signs and symptoms go unnoticed until health has irreversibly deteriorated. Research findings published in Nature today hint at a future where anyone, anywhere, might be able to perform a basic skin cancer screening on a smartphone. Utilizing machine learning, a Stanford team, including… Read More ...
  • These genetically modified cyborg dragonflies could perform ‘guided pollination’  We are now in a day and age where cyborg insects no longer even raise an eyebrow. Hell, you can order kits! But this particular cyborg insect is especially interesting: a dragonfly that has been modified inside and out to follow the path programm… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click ...
  • Good luck silencing science  Technology and the internet have empowered science just as they have business and communication. As with the others, tech has helped make scientific endeavors global in scope, robust against interference, and accessible by billions — with or without the consent of the powers that be. That’s just one reason why the current administration’s efforts to ...
  • Bots_alive kit imbues toy robots with charming, lifelike AI  There will be no shortage at Toy Fair next month of robots and gadgets promising artificial intelligence — and generally falling short. But a more modest approach from an actual AI researcher has produced a clever and accessible way to create lifelike behavior through a simple and elegant modification of a popular existing robot. Read ...
  • Google Lunar XPrize down to 5 finalists aiming to fly to the moon in 2017  Google’s Lunar XPrize competition is nearing its zenith – the slate of competitors is down to five finalists, all of whom are competing to be the first private company to launch a spacecraft destined for the moon by the end of 2017. The five remaining teams include SpaceIL, Moon Express, Synergy Moon, Team Indus and ...
  • Chan Zuckerberg Initiative acquires and will free up science search engine Meta  Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan’s $45 billion philanthropy organization is making its first acquisition in order to make it easier for scientists to search, read and tie together more than 26 million science research papers. The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is acquiring Meta, an AI-powered research search engine startup, and will make its tool free to ...
  • Fake news’ power to influence shrinks with a contextual warning, study finds  Research conducted by social psychologists at Cambridge University in the UK, and Yale and George Mason in the US, offers a potential strategy for mitigating the spread of misinformation online — involving the use of pro-active warnings designed to contextualize and pre-expose web users to related but fake information in order to debunk factual distortion ...
  • The genomics intelligence revolution  We’ve entered a new phase in the history of whole-genome sequencing; it has opened the door to understanding our entire world at the molecular level. With this intelligence, we’ll be able to understand, influence and optimize the way we interact with ourselves and our natural world. The promise of genomics is just beginning — we ...
  • Come on, let’s go to Pluto  Hey do you want to go far, far away from this place right now for some reason? Check out Pluto – it’s far. NASA created a video (via Gizmodo) made up of around 100 images snapped by the New Horizons probe, which launched in 2006 and which completed a flyby of the dwarf planet in 2015. ...
  • XNOR.ai frees AI from the prison of the supercomputer  Machine learning and AI are incredible tools, but they also require a similarly incredible amount of computing power. If that requirement could be cut by a couple orders of magnitude, AI would be unfettered from its banks of parallel processors and free to inhabit practically any device — which is exactly what a breakthrough at ...
  • 2016 is the new hottest year on record – how NASA takes the planet’s temperature  NASA announced on Wednesday that in 2016, Earth experienced the hottest surface temperatures in modern history. Separate, independent analysis at NOAA provided the same conclusion. This makes the third year in a row that Earth experienced record high temperatures. These record years are part of a concerning long-term trend of increasing global temperatures. In fact, 16 ...
  • Forward, a $149 per month medical startup, aims to be the Apple Store of doctor’s offices  It was cold and pouring outside as the Uber pulled up at 180 Sutter Street in downtown San Francisco. Inside, a man dressed all in black offered to take my jacket and umbrella as he ushered me through the clinical white lobby to a set of chairs, handing me a bottle of VOSS. I scanned the ...
  • A new lawsuit alleges anti-aging startup Elysium Health hasn’t paid its supplier and is in breach of agreement  Chromadex, the sole supplier of pterostilbene and Nicotinamide Riboside (NR), the two ingredients in anti-aging startup Elysium’s products, is suing Elysium Health for failure to make payments on those ingredients and for breach of a trademark and royalties agreement. According to a document on Chromadex’s website, dated Dec 29, 2106, Elysium “made false promises and… Read More Share this:Click to email ...
  • SpaceX successfully returns to launch with Iridium-1 NEXT Falcon 9 mission  SpaceX has succeeded in launch a Falcon 9 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, its first launch since a Falcon 9 rocket exploded on a launch pad in pre-flight procedures in September 2016. The launch took place at 9:54 AM PT Saturday, during an instant launch window. It’s a huge victory for SpaceX, ...
  • SpaceX successfully lands its first-stage Falcon 9 rocket on drone ship  SpaceX successfully recovered its first stage Falcon 9 rocket during a launch on Saturday, marking the 7th rocket recovered overall, and the first one for this drone landing barge, Just Read The Instructions. The recovery was captured on video from the rocket’s perspective, too, so you can see the entire process as it touches down. Developing… ...
  • The case for farming subsidies after Brexit | Letters George Monbiot makes many good points (Farmers fear life outside the EU, but it could mean a rebirth for rural Britain, 11 January), including free markets’ impact on small farmers whose incomes fall in times of plenty. He could have said more on food security. Climate change, including gas escapes from frozen deposits, is a growing ...
  • This 20-cent whirligig toy can replace a $1,000 medical centrifuge  Centrifuges are found in medical labs worldwide. But a good one could run you a couple grand and, of course, requires electricity — neither of which are things you’re likely to find in a rural clinic in an impoverished country. Stanford researchers have created an alternative that costs just a few cents and runs without ...
  • This Swiss watch would power, and be powered by, a heartbeat  Swiss researchers have given a literal twist to the proverbial ticker, designing a clock-like device that could help power pacemakers by harvesting energy from the heart itself — just like an automatic watch harvests movement from the motion of the wrist. Read More Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to ...
  • Where to pick a pack of fresh peppercorns? | Brief letters Getting the measure of GDP | Finding rare ingredients | Nepotism in politics | Gabriel Jesus headline | Bees’ knees | Er, so, well Re Aditya Chakrabortty’s article (One blunt heckler has shown just how much our economists are failing us, 10 January), GDP is a crazy measure for prosperity: a country’s GDP equals the aggregate ...
  • Women’s health startup Celmatix now offers genetic testing for fertility issues  Celmatix, a startup with a focus on personalized medicine for women, wants to take some of the mystery out of the science of baby-making with a new type of DNA-based fertility test called Fertilome. Fertilome looks at 49 variants in 32 different … Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to ...
  • Illumina wants to sequence your whole genome for $100  The first sequencing of the whole human genome in 2003 cost roughly $2.7 billion but DNA sequencing giant Illumina has now unveiled a new machine that the company says is “expected one day” to order up your whole genome for less than $100. Illumina’s CEO Frank deSouza showed off the machine, called the NovaSeq, onstage at ...
  • Uber’s David Plouffe will run politics for the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative  If you want to cure all disease and educate everyone, you’re going to need the government’s help, even if you’re as rich as Mark Zuckerberg. Today, he and his wife Priscilla’s philanthropic vehicle the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative announced it’s hired away Uber’s chief advisor and former Obama campaign manager David Plouffe to lead its policy ...
  • Venneos launches a device for faster, better imaging of individual cells in biotech  The imaging technologies used in the medical and biotech fields may be powerful and indispensable for research and diagnosis, but they also can be slow and clumsy — relics of techniques that go back decades. Venneos wants to change that with its new device, which allows easy and continuous monitoring of a handful of individual ...
  • Grail is raising at least $1 billion to fund its early cancer screening test  The early cancer screening startup Grail plans to raise more than $1 billion in Series B financing today, possibly up to $1.8 billion. While the company doesn’t want to name investor names, only mentioning in a release the funding will come “primarily from undisclosed private and strategic investors,” Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Google… ...
  • SOSV, “the accelerator VC,” closes third fund at $150 million  Since the advent of accelerators, venture capitalists have competed to lock in deals with the best startups in a given batch. Entrepreneur turned investor Sean O’ Sullivan thought it would be better to develop a venture firm that owned and ran its own accelerators, instead. Today that firm, SOSV, has closed its third fund at $150 million ...
  • How technology is merging with the human body  The gulf between “human” and “machine” is closing. Machine learning has enabled virtual reality to feel more “real” than ever before, and AI’s replication of processes that were once confined to the human brain is ever-improving. Both are bringing technology into ever-closer proximity with the human body. Things are getting weird. And they are going ...
  • Neurable nets $2 million to build brain-controlled software for AR and VR  As consumers get their first taste of voice-controlled home robots and motion-based virtual realities, a quiet swath of technologists are thinking big picture about what comes after that. The answer has major implications for the way we’ll interact with our devices in the near future. Spoiler alert: We won’t be yelling or waving at them; ...
  • Facebook’s secretive hardware team signs rapid collaboration deal with 17 universities  Facebook’s shadowy Building 8 research team needs help from academia to invent futuristic hardware. But today’s pace of innovation doesn’t allow for the standard 9-12 month turnaround time it takes universities to strike one-off research partnerships with private companies. Enter SARA, aka Facebook’s “Sponsored Academic Research Agreement”. It’s a… Read More ...
  • Artificial leaf captures light to power drug production  Drug production is generally a matter of big factories churning out millions of aspirin or ibuprofen tablets a day, but there’s a lot to be said for manufacturing common drugs on a small scale, close to where they’re used. Researchers from the Netherlands have created an efficient and simple method for doing so that uses ...
  • Moth eyes inspired the design of this hypersensitive camera  If you wanted to see in the dark, you could do worse than follow the example of moths, which have of course made something of a speciality of it. That, at least, is what NASA researchers did when designing a powerful new camera that will capture … Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens ...
  • NASA tech could track firefighters where GPS can’t reach  In the chaotic environment of a fire or disaster area, knowing where your fellow firefighters and first responders are is of the utmost importance, but GPS and other positional tracking systems aren’t always reliable. A project from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory aims to solve this with a tracker that relies on a totally different kind ...
  • Microsoft’s plan to use machine learning to improve eyecare in India  Competition that results in better care for people suffering from visual impairments is the right kind of competition. Following a path similar to that of Google’s DeepMind, Microsoft announced this morning that it’s launching a new research group, the Microsoft Intelligent Network for Eyecare, to bring data-driven eyecare services to India. Whereas DeepMind’s swing… Read More ...
  • 5-year, 2-petabyte digital survey of the night sky is the largest ever released  Astronomers have a powerful new resource in the Pan-STARRS survey of the night sky, carried out over five years and half a million exposures from the top of Mauna Kea on Maui. The two petabytes of data released publicly today cover three quarters… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to ...
  • OneWeb raises $1.2B to offer satellite-based internet services as soon as 2019  The battle for satellite-powered internet is heating up. Weeks after Tesla asked the U.S. government for permission to launch a service powered by thousands of satellites above the Earth, rival project OneWeb has raised $1.2 billion in new fundin… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens ...
  • Pokémon GO fitness gains were short-lived  During the supreme madness of the Pokémon GO season this summer, it wasn’t uncommon to hear people talk about how the insanely popular game was boosting activity levels and making people walk miles more than they did before. That effect appears to have been significantly overstated, according to research published in the British Medical Journal. ...
  • Looking for happiness in life and at work | Letters Richard Layard is promoting the idea that better provision of mental health services is more important than reducing social inequalities in promoting human happiness (Happiness depends on health and friends, not money, says new study, theguardian.com, 12 December). This is a false dichotomy. Evidence suggests that austerity damages our collective health. Deepening economic and social ...
  • How to DIY a Westworld host at home  Building a Westworld host is kind of like putting together a piece of IKEA furniture while on hallucinogenics — directions are pretty much useless. Instead, here are some *guidelines* for DIY-ing your own Westworld host at home. Read More Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click ...
  • Real-time motion capture system from Disney Research uses as few sensors as possible  Serious motion capture setups often involve dozens of optical markers, inertial sensors, or both, making them a pain to set up and tear down, and producing a ton of data. This Disney Research project produces high-quality results from just a hand… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on ...
  • Can a change in economic policies cope with anger and alienation? | Letters Pankaj Mishra’s exposé of the poverty of economic man (Welcome to the age of anger, 8 December) is powerful but, among the “more complex drives” he lists, he omits “belonging” – key to understanding “identity politics”. Facing danger our instinct, like that of animals who herd, is to cling to the familiar and the group. ...
  • Berkeley project tests tracking imperiled forests with 3D multispectral drone imaging  Droughts, climate change, and deforestation are putting forests at risk worldwide, so studying these ecosystems closely is more important than ever — but it’s a hell of a lot of work to climb every tree in the Sierra Nevada. Drones and advanced imaging, however, present an increasingly practical alternative to that, as a UC Berkeley ...
  • GIFs in space! NASA makes an official channel on Giphy  In addition to exploring the solar system and performing critical and fascinating research on the Earth itself, NASA produces a lot of cool imagery. And as we all know, GIFs are the best way to enjoy pretty much any kind of visual stimuli — so it is with joy that I can relate that NASA ...
  • This ‘artificial iris’ is like a pair of programmable shades in contact lens form  Smart contact lenses have been the stuff of science fiction for a long time, but as with jetpacks and faster-than-light travel, we’re still waiting on them. Research is ongoing, though, and a project at the University of Ghent shows promise not just in advancing the technology but providing some therapeutic value as well. Read More ...
  • New journal Science Robotics is established to chronicle the rise of the robots  Over the last few years, robotics and every other field have come to inform and improve each other, and robots have begun to infiltrate and affect our lives in countless ways. So the only surprise in the news that the prestigious journal group Science has established a discrete Robotics imprint is that they didn’t do ...
  • Microsoft researchers sound off on the next decade in tech  It’s Computer Science Education Week, in case you didn’t know, and in honor of this hallowed period Microsoft is publishing the thoughts of a few of its scientists and engineers on what will change in the tech world over the next decade. Read More Share this:Click to email this to a ...
  • Red carpet roundup: Silicon Valley goes Hollywood for 2017 Breakthrough Prize Ceremony  Covering a red carpet isn’t usually a skill in the repertoire of tech journalists, but it’s also not every day that you get to see Vin Diesel and Kevin Durant on the same stage as Mark Zuckerberg, Priscilla Chan and Sergey Brin. If the White House Correspondents’ Dinner is nerd prom, the Breakthrough Prize Ceremony is nerds taking over Ibiza. During the ...
  • WTF is AI?  Cogito, ergo sum. We’ve all heard that famous assertion, foundation for a modern philosophy of self, consciousness, and individualism. But Descartes had it easy: for him, thought was self-evident — he didn’t have to define it. What is thought? What is intelligence? And can a machine be said to possess either? The field of artificial ...
  • These science superstars just won the 2017 Breakthrough Prize  Today at the 5th annual Breakthrough Prize, some of Silicon Valley’s biggest names will award more than $25 million to scientific research in departments across the globe. The event splices together research scientists far more accustomed to red tape than red carpets with tech’s deepest-pocketed and most idealistic upper echelons. The result is a flashy, ...
  • Augmented reality treatment reduces phantom pain in missing limbs  Phantom limb pain is a mysterious ailment: people with amputations experience aches and acute pains in an arm or leg that isn’t there — making the problem notoriously difficult to treat. But a new type of therapy using augmented reality is surprisingly effective at reducing even the most intractable phantom pain. Read More ...