Science

  • Why tech workers showed up to March for Science  Science itself may be non-partisan. But the March for Science this weekend simply couldn’t be. Demonstrators turned out in an estimated 600 cities around the world to rally for science and its role in policy-making, many tech workers among them. The march was organized after the Trump administration proposed and began to implement steep budget cuts to federal science ...
  • PowerRay is an underwater drone for filmmakers or fishermen  The creator of the PowerEgg, an ovoid flying robot, has begun accepting orders for its newest creation, a submersible camera drone for home use. Dubbed the PowerRay, the waterproof device can find, attract and record fish. It operates at a depth of 30 meters, or about 98 feet, for up to four hours at a ...
  • Theranos says it has been mischaracterized in allegations the company faked tests  Theranos secretly bought lab equipment through a shell company, faked tests and inappropriately pumped up its financial outlook to investors, according to allegations in recently unsealed court documents, first reported by the Wall Street Journal… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to ...
  • Using wearable technology to detect conflict in couples before it occurs  Several teams of researchers at USC have joined forces for a study aimed at detecting vital signs to help stem conflicts in couples before they occur. Couples were brought into the lab, equipped with wearable sensors, given smartphones for record… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook ...
  • Planet enlists machine learning experts to parse a treasure trove of Amazon basin data  Planet, the satellite imaging company that operate the largest commercial Earth imaging constellation in existence, is hosting a new data science competition on the Kaggle platform, with the specific aim of developing machine learning techniques around forestry research. Planet will open up access to thousands of image ‘chips,’ or blocks covering around 1 sauce kilometre, ...
  • Scientists are racing nanocars on a solid gold track  Scientists are set to engage in a frivolous race of single-molecule “nanocars” on, if you can believe it, a solid gold track. It’s the boldest show of academic elitism and greatest waste of taxpayer dollars since the duck penis thing. Oh wait, it’s actually the greatest thing of all time. Read More ...
  • Facebook plans ethics board to monitor its brain-computer interface work  Facebook will assemble an independent Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) panel to oversee its development of a direct brain-to-computer typing interface it previewed today at its F8 conference. Facebook’s R&D department Building 8’s head Regina Dugan tells TechCrunch, “It’s early days . . . we’re in the process of forming it right now.” Read ...
  • Figure 1, a knowledge-sharing app for doctors, launches sponsored content  Since its launch in 2013, Figure 1, a photo- and knowledge-sharing app for medical professionals, has focused on “traction” that is winning over new users and keeping them around. The app now boasts registered users in 190 countries, with three-quarters of U.S. med students using Figure 1. Today, the Toronto- and New York-based startup revealed ...
  • New apps from MIT fill your waiting moments with learning opportunities  MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has come up with a way to fill those few seconds of waiting everyone experiences while their social media apps load, or their phone connects to WiFi. It may not seem like much, but filling these gaps can can a significant aggregate effect, given how much time ...
  • Doughnut economics and string theories | Brief letters Alternative economics | ‘Bubble’ laces | Dear Dr Banana | Rebranding bank holidays | TV juxtapositions I still recall a comment in my first economics lesson that there is no obvious limit to human wants. Lugubrious US comic Steve Wright provided a perfect retort: “You can’t have everything; where would you put it?” It is encouraging ...
  • NASA finds evidence of life-supporting conditions on Saturn’s moon Enceladus  NASA held a press conference on Thursday to reveal some exciting new discoveries about ocean worlds within our solar system: It has found evidence that suggest a type of chemical energy that can support life exists on Enceladus, one of Saturn’s 62 confirmed moons. The new evidence comes from the Cassini spacecraft, which has been ...
  • Get up close and personal with Boeing’s svelte new spacesuit  For its upcoming crewed spaceflight missions, Boeing worked with David Clark Company, a Massachusetts-based company that makes flight and aviation suits, as well as headsets for pilots to come up with brand new spacesuits. The goal was to create a new kind of spacesuit for a new kind of astronaut – Boeing wants to be ...
  • New 4D prints transform into permanent shapes when heat is applied  New work out of Georgia Tech promises to lend a sense of permanence to shape-shifting 3D printing. The technology, commonly referred to as 4D printing by those in the know, aims to add another dimension to the 3D printing process by creating an object designed to change shape after it leaves the print bed. Most models ...
  • High-speed camera rig captures 3D images of birds’ wings in flight  You don’t have to be an ornithologist to know that birds are pretty good at flying. But while we know how they do it in general, the millimeter- and microsecond-level details are difficult to pin down. Researchers at Stanford are demystifying bird flight with a custom camera/projector setup, and hoping to eventually replicate its adaptability ...
  • NASA and Amazon will stream from space in 4K for the first time on April 26  You might have a 4K television or display, but what content is really worthy of that kind of resolution? Sports? Pfft. Netflix shows? Ha. But how about space? According to people who’ve been there (who are probably best positioned to know), there’s nothing quite like the view from outside the Earth’s atmosphere, so it might ...
  • NASA to reveal new findings around ocean worlds beyond Earth this week  NASA will hold a press conference on Thursday, starting at 2 PM ET, at which it will discuss new discoveries related to ocean worlds found within our solar system. The fresh findings come from the Cassini spacecraft, which was launched in 1997 and arrived at its destination orbiting Saturn in 2004, and the Hubble Space Telescope. The ...
  • Sean Parker’s cancer institute may have found a blood test to find out if patients will respond to treatment  Scientists in collaboration with tech billionaire Sean Parker’s Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy may have found a way to predict whether melanoma patients will respond to treatments that target the PD-1 (programmed cell death protein) pathway in tumors through a simple blood test, according to a paper in the scientific journal Nature. Read More Share this:Click to ...
  • A $150 million fund, The Engine, will back startups others find ‘too hard’  A fund and accelerator for advanced technology startups, The Engine, closed its debut fund at a robust $150 million this week, according to its President, CEO and Managing Partner Katie Rae. Last year, TechCrunch reported that MIT was investing $… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook ...
  • Bristol Festival of Ideas 2017: Reflections on 100 years of change Revolution, radicalism and rebellion dominate this year, as writers, journalists and academics look back on a century of political upheaval• Bristol Festival of Ideas 2017 It’s impossible to ignore the atmosphere of change and rebellion in 2017. Just months ago, Britain voted for Brexit and America for Donald Trump. We’ll be exploring the implications of both ...
  • Spotting sockpuppets with science  If you’ve ever ventured into the comment section of a website or spent any time on forums or social media, you’ve probably encountered sockpuppets, fake accounts controlled by a single person — though it’s possible you didn’t know it at the time. New research may help ID these overeager commentators automatically, which is good news ...
  • A mega-telescope is trying to take the first image ever of a black hole, hell yeah  This week, a massive international array of the most powerful radio telescopes on the planet set its sights on the most camera-shy subject of all, the black hole. Badassly known as the Event Horizon Telescope, the global web of telescopes seeks to capture the first image of the supermassive black hole at the center of the ...
  • OpenAI sets benchmark for sentiment analysis using an efficient mLSTM  The researchers over at OpenAI were able to use a recurrent mLSTM character-level model trained on Amazon reviews to identify the sentiment of blocks of text. And perhaps more interestingly, the team was able to generate new text with customizabl… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook ...
  • Stellar echoes, Venusian automatons and more gain NASA moonshot funding  NASA has announced the recipients of its most recent round of highly experimental projects it deems promising enough to fund. These NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts aren’t guaranteed to go all the way, but are rather sort of low-risk, high potential reward moonshots — science fiction they hope will be more the former than the latter. ...
  • Microsoft Maluuba teaches management 101 to machines in its first paper since being acquired  In mid-January, the ongoing race for AI put Montreal-based Maluuba on our radar. Microsoft acquired the startup and its team of researchers to build better machine intelligence tools for analyzing unstructured text to enable more natural human computer interaction — think bots that can actually respond with reasonable intelligence to a text you send. The ...
  • About this stabbing machine  Thank you for joining me, ladies, gentlemen. Researchers have created a “stabbing machine,” with which they intend to “simulate stabbing events,” with the further intention of getting to the heart of knife-related crimes. Now, I don’t have a problem with teaching robots knifeplay per se, but we must be circumspect. We must be careful. We ...
  • 23andMe is finally allowed to tell you if you have the genes for Parkinsons  The Food and Drug Administration finally gave 23andMe a long sought-after green light today to sell genetic tests and their accompanying health risk reports to consumers for up to ten diseases, including late onset Alzheimers and Parkinson’s. In November 2013, the FDA put a moratorium on 23andMe’s ability to provide any health information associated with its ...
  • The 5 Most Surprising Inventions to Come Out of World War I You’ve probably used at least one of these items Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on ...
  • Swiss system ups security and reliability of finger-based biometrics  Biometrics may not be the perfect solution for security, but they can be useful — as long as they’re robust and well thought out. TouchID is all well and good, but you wouldn’t secure a nuclear site with it. Well, movies aside, you probably should secure a nuclear site with a fingerprint regardless. But this ...
  • Unpaywall scours the web for free versions of scientific papers  The science publishing world is a complex one, but the pendulum is currently swinging away from the paywalled mega-journals of the last decade to a more open model — but it can still be hard to find a full copy of an article you need on short notice. Unpaywall is a browser plug-in that identifies ...
  • Watch SpaceX’s reused Falcon 9 rocket nail the landing a second time  SpaceX has posted a video of the Falcon 9 rocket it used first last year during the CRS-8 mission, and then again just last week during the SES-10 mission. The reuse of the rocket was historic in itself, but the kicker was the successful recovery… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new ...
  • Graphene used to sieve salts from seawater  Researchers at the University of Manchester have come up with a method for controlling the permeation of graphene oxide membranes — enabling the nanomaterial to act as a sieve to desalinate seawater. Read More Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share ...
  • Data Collective and SynBioBeta founder John Cumbers launch a seed stage biotech fund  Data Collective (DCVC) is bringing Dr. John Cumbers, the founder of synthetic biology platform SynBioBeta and setting him up with his own biotech fund for pre-seed and seed stage startups, aptly called the DCVC SynBioBeta Fund. DCVC co-managing partner Matt Ocko, who spoke to TechCrunch about the new development didn’t have an exact number set ...
  • Google’s Project Loon head is getting into nuclear power  Google X’s raison d’être is embracing far-out ideas, so it’s no surprise, really that former director Mike Cassidy is wading into the decidedly choppy and always controversial waters of nuclear energy. Read More Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in ...
  • Boeing and ULA demo their Emergency Egress System for crewed space launches  Boeing and the ULA are getting closer to launching their CST-100 Starliner aboard an Atlas V rocket, as a private contractor shuttling astronauts to and from the International Space Station. The space companies wanted to give a true demonstration of their progress, and so invited us to check out their Emergency Egress System (EES) in action ...
  • The campaign to put science and tech leaders in public office starts now Some are running for Congress, others are getting training now. Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share ...
  • Here are the frontier startups that presented at Singularity University’s third demo day  The nine startups participating in Singularity University’s accelerator program presented this afternoon at Moffett Federal Airfield just outside Mountain View, CA. Singularity University, founded in 2008 by Peter Diamandis and Ray Kurzweil, aims to make it more feasible for people to address hard science problems and those that require a global reach. Startups backed by… Read More Share this:Click to ...
  • NASA tests robotic tools to crack the surface of icy moons  While the Mars rovers are searching the red planet for water over the next decade, there are whole moons full of the stuff just waiting for us to come visit. At least, that’s the theory. But missions to Europa and Titan are still hypothetical, so in the meantime NASA is toying with ideas about how ...
  • SpaceX’s first Falcon Heavy launch could attempt upper stage recovery  Elon Musk suggested Friday that when SpaceX does its first demonstration flight of the Falcon Heavy large payload rocket later this year, it might also include an attempt to return the upper stage back to Earth. Ultimately, the goal is to make sure the upper stage on the Falcon Heavy is reusable, which is part ...
  • SpaceX’s reused Falcon 9 rocket nails the landing for a second time  SpaceX has completed the other key ingredient of its historic flight today, recovering its Falcon 9 rocket via its floating drone barge. This is a huge accomplishment because it already did this once before – with the same rocket, on the same barge, when it landed last year following a successful launch during a resupply ...
  • Baidu’s AI team taught a virtual agent just like a human would their baby  Baidu’s artificial intelligence research team has achieved a significant milestone: teaching a virtual agent ‘living’ in a 2D environment how to navigate its world using natural language commands, by first teaching it language through positive and negative reinforcement. The especially exciting thing, according to the scientists, is that the agent ended up developing a… Read ...
  • Google bets on AI in Canada with Google Brain Toronto and Vector Institute investment  Google is contributing to the $150 million going into The Vector Institute, a new initiative housed at the University of Toronto, guided by chief scientific adviser Geoffrey Hinton. The Institute is getting started today, with significant investment from the governments of Canada and the province of Ontario. Google’s contribution is around $5 million, but it’s likely ...
  • SpaceX will try to make history with its first reused rocket launch this week  SpaceX is set to launch its next Falcon 9 rocket on Thursday, March 30 for SES-10, a mission for a private communications satellite company. This is different from every Falcon 9 launch that has preceded it, because the rocket SpaceX is using has already flown once before – on April 8 last year, when it ...
  • NASA’s new searchable media library is a treasure trove of space pics and video  Do you like space? Do you like looking at it, wishing you were there instead of here, perhaps? Well NASA just did something that will make your day. The U.S. space agency launched a new web-based search engine for much of its catalog of images, video and audio files, which you can browse by keyword ...
  • ESA shows off sweet new renders of the Exomars 2020 rover  Late last year the European Space Agency doubled down on its Mars mission, dedicating half a billion euros to the next phase of its Exomars 2020 program — and now we are seeing the benefits of that enormous investment: a pretty awesome new render of the rover they plan to deploy to the Martian surface. ...
  • NASA is using a mixed reality space station to train astronauts  NASA has always embraced emerging technology for visualization, even if that tech was seemingly developed for frivolous entertainment. We recently covered its holographic Mars exhibit, and the many 3D resources that NASA makes available to developers and educators. Now, the US space agency has partnered with Epic Games’ Unreal Engine to create a mixed reality International Space… Read More ...
  • Japanese authorities decry ongoing robot failures at Fukushima  Six years ago, a massive earthquake, consequent tsunami and nuclear crisis struck Japan. International organizations rushed to help the country’s devastated residents, and to figure out how to clean up Fukushima Daiichi, the wrecked nuclear power plant. Robots offered a ray of hope amid unfathomable loss. At least they did, until recently. As the Asahi ...
  • Swedish scientists successfully implant 3D-printed human cartilage cells in baby mice  In what could potentially serve as an important moment in the quest to 3D-print body parts, a team of scientists from Sweden’s Sahlgrenska Academy and Chalmers University of Technology have managed to successfully implant human cartilage cells in six-week-old baby mice. Read More Share this:Click to email this to a friend ...
  • Swedish scientists successfully implant 3D-printed human cartilage cells in baby mice  In what could potentially serve as an important moment in the quest to 3D-print body parts, a team of scientists from Sweden’s Sahlgrenska Academy and Chalmers University of Technology have managed to successfully implant human cartilage cells in six-week-old baby mice. Read More Share this:Click to email this to a friend ...
  • From smugglers to supermarkets: the ‘informal economy’ touches us all You may think that a smuggler in the Tunisian desert has nothing to do with your trip to the supermarket. You’re wrong As I talk to him, Ahmed pulls his chair into his store to escape the hot Tunisian sun. He is a retired teacher – the years of screaming children can be counted in the ...
  • MIT researchers take a cue from color-changing beetles in quest to 3D print robot skin  When Subramanian Sundaram’s team hit a roadblock in its quest to build a 3D printed robot, it turned, as roboticists often do, to nature. The team of MIT researchers drew inspiration for the latest step in the process from the golden tortoise beetle – a North America beetle species with a unique form of camouflage. ...
  • Causes of the global water crisis and 12 companies trying to solve it  It’s World Water Day. Time to wake up and take shorter showers. That is, if we’re fortunate enough to have them. Water scarcity and pollution are persistent global problems. According to End Water Poverty, some 663 million people around the world have absolutely no reliable access to clean, safe water year-round. And two-thirds of the world population faces ...
  • Behold the robo-fruit  Perhaps you’ve been watching the BBC’s Spy in the Wild, in which meticulously recreated robotic animals cohabitate with their fleshy brethren and record all their secret goings and doings. But haven’t you ever wondered what fruit gets up to during the long trip from its homeland to your local produce department? These robo-fruits are your ...
  • The Mednet launches its ‘Quora for cancer,’ an online medical knowledge base  A New York City startup called The Mednet today launched a platform that gives physicians a knowledge-sharing tool that’s as easy to use as Quora, but provides them with expert answers about the latest research in their field. The site has focused, so far, strictly on cancer. Read More Share this:Click ...
  • NASA’s pop-up robot can tackle tight spots where rovers can’t reach  NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is pretty much a non-stop source of amazing things, and the latest is the PUFFER, or Pop-Up Flat Folding Robot. The design of the robot is inspired by origami, and folding is its specialty. Read More Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on ...
  • WebMD taps Apple’s ResearchKit for study on factors contributing to healthy pregnancies  There are still a lot of unknowns in the medical world when it comes to pregnancy – including what factors lead to carrying a healthy fetus to term. That’s why WebMD and Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) have launched a new investigative study via WebMD’s newly redesigned pregnancy app and is teaming up with Apple’s ResearchKit ...
  • Trump flips science the bird with new budget Cuts threaten US leadership in science, would result in widespread job losses. Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click ...
  • OceanGate plans an expedition to 3D scan the Titanic  Seattle-based OceanGate Inc. this week announced plans for a manned expedition to study the R.M.S. Titanic, the world’s most famous shipwreck. Fewer than 200 people have ever visited the Titanic since it sank in April 1912 according to historians’ estimates. To put that in perspective, more people have scaled the summit of Mt. Everest, or ...
  • Seriously, this skull-drilling robot is good news for humanity  When someone invents a robot specifically made to drill into the skulls of unconscious, immobile humans, you’d be forgiven for feeling a natural reaction along the lines of “for the love of god, why?” But trust me, this particular robotic trepanation station is a good idea. Read More Share this:Click to ...
  • X-ray technique creates nanometer-scale 3D reconstructions of computer chips  The chips in our devices are powered by transistors and circuits so small that they can barely be detected by our most advanced imaging techniques. How chip makers manage to do quality control when they can’t even see what they’re working is a really good question. A new method from Swiss researchers provides an incredibly ...
  • Teen quiz app Wishbone hacked, users’ emails and phone numbers exposed  Check your kid’s phone for this app, ASAP: Wishbone, a popular quiz app for kids, tweens and teens, has been hacked, according to a report from Motherboard out this morning. The hack involved 2.2 million email addresses as well as 287,000 phone numbers, many of which are from kids under the age of 18. The app ...
  • The financial benefits of the EPA data Trump doesn’t want you to know about Making EPA data easily accessible to the private sector plays a significant role in many billion-dollar industries, from renewable energy to auto manufacturing A guide to the EPA data under threat by the Trump administration For more than 25 years, Walter Hang has helped local governments, engineers and homeowners make sense of hazardous waste. To do that, ...
  • MIT lab’s smart boots could keep astronauts on their feet  If you’ve ever worn a spacesuit during a moonwalk or EVA, and I know a lot of you have, you were probably frustrated by how difficult it is to move around — both with the restrictions of the suit itself and the limitations on what you can see and feel. Researchers want to make things ...
  • CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna shines hope on the future of genetic modification at SXSW  Jennifer Doudna, co-inventor of CRISPR Cas9 technology, or the ability to program genes using a special enzyme, spoke about the promises of this technology on stage at SXSW this afternoon. In a keynote today, Doudna noted that while this technology is very young (less than five years old), “it’s been deployed very rapidly for existing applications,” ...
  • Bolt Threads debuts its first product, a $314 tie made from spiderwebs  It may not look like a bunch of cobwebs but the tie you see above was spun from the same material spiders spin out from their behind. The difference is this thread was mass produced from fermented microbial poop instead and it’s the first product out from materials science startup Bolt Threads. Intrigued? We first ...
  • Storing data in a single atom proved possible by IBM researchers  The fundamental components of computers are becoming small enough that they are pressing against the boundaries of the familiar world of Newtonian physics. And nowhere is the scale and precision of operation on better display than in hard disk dr… Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook ...
  • With $37 million in funding, health startup Virta aims to cure type 2 diabetes by watching what you eat  Type 2 diabetes is a disease affecting 415 million people globally and Virta, a Silicon Valley-based health startup, believes it has something unique to reverse it – remote monitoring of everything you eat. Most people with the disease end up having to constantly monitor their blood sugar with the prick of a needle and diabetic pills or ...
  • Disney Research has robots matching verbal styles with kids  Roboticists at Disney Research are investigating how to improve the quality of human-robot interactions by studying how speech patterns affect engagement with a creepy anthropomorphic bot that imitates its playmates’ speech. Read More Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in ...
  • How Hazel Technologies keeps fresh fruit and vegetables from spoiling  Chicago-based Hazel Technologies is on a mission to reduce food waste. The company has developed packaging inserts that, through the magic of basic chemistry, can ward off fungus, mold and slow the spoilage of fruits and vegetables. How big a problem is food waste? The most recent available reports from the U.S. Department of Agriculture have ...
  • Watch World View explain its unique approach to space business and tourism  World View’s new spaceport in Tucson, Arizona is focused on a unique task: Launching high altitude balloons that will take equipment, and eventually people, to the Earth’s stratosphere to do work in an edge-of-space operating theater. We got the chance to go to the facility’s grand opening, and interview CEO and co-founder Jane Poynter, as ...
  • Jeff Bezos wants Blue Origin to be the Amazon of the Moon  Not one to be left out, Amazon and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos is also making plans to go to the Moon, just like fellow space magnate Elon Musk. Bezos’ plan, uncovered by The Washington Post via a draft proposal presented to NASA and Trump’s administration, outlines Blue Origin’s plan to create a cargo spacecraft ...
  • NASA released a ton of software for free and here’s some you should try  NASA has just published its 2017-2018 software catalog, which lists the many apps, code libraries and tools that pretty much anyone can download and use. Of course, most of it is pretty closely tied to… you know, launching spacecraft and stuff, which most people don’t do. But here are a few items that might prove ...
  • Honda’s new R&D Center X will focus on robots, energy and AI  Honda opened its new Innovation Lab Tokyo to press for the first time on Tuesday, and also marked the occasion by announcing the debut of a new tech R&D group within the facility called R&D Center X. The new unit will begin operations in April, and will focus on the kind of cutting edge stuff ...
  • LeoLabs raises $4M to build out its space debris collision avoidance network  Low-Earth orbit is a prime candidate for explosive commercial growth, but it’s also a space where the risk of actual explosions resulting from debris impact is a legitimate concern for businesses focused on the opportunity. That’s the problem LeoLabs aims to address, a startup spun out of SRI International to detect, map and help avoid collisions ...
  • SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft successfully attaches to the ISS  SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft, which launched on Sunday and is filled with 5,500 pounds of supplies and experiment materials for the crew of the International Space Station has successfully docked. The Dragon craft had missed its first attempt at meeting up with the station, due to a GPS error. It’s the first time since 2012 that ...
  • Research heralds better and bidirectional brain-computer interfaces  A pair of studies, one from Stanford and another from the University of Geneva, exemplify the speed with which brain-computer interfaces are advancing; and while you won’t be using one instead of a mouse and keyboard any time soon, even in its nascent form the tech may prove transformative for the disabled. Read More ...