Dealmaster: Take $150 off a 10.5-inch Apple iPad Pro

Dealmaster: Take $150 off a 10.5-inch Apple iPad Pro

Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains, we have another round of deals to share. Today’s list is headlined by a deal on Apple’s 10.5-inch iPad Pro, the 64GB model of which is currently down to $500 at Amazon. While this model technically launched in 2017, it still retails for $650, which makes this a $150 discount.

While some users have been able to fulfill Apple’s promise of turning the iPad Pro into their primary work computer, most people have not. Taken purely as a tablet, though, this is still a premium device. Though the 10.5-inch Pro doesn’t have the thinner bezels, flatter edges and brand new chipset of the latest models, its A10X processor and 4GB of RAM are still more than fast enough for most needs, and its 120Hz display is still bright and ultra-smooth. There’s no USB-C port, but there is a 3.5mm headphone jack and a Touch ID button for those who don’t want to give those up just yet.

To be clear, Apple’s basic 9.7-inch iPad is still the best value for those who just want to do basic tablet things, and the newer iPad Pros are better suited for heavier-duty work. But at this price, the 10.5-inch iPad Pro is at least a more realistic buy for consumers who want a higher-end tablet for media consumption, gaming, and some light computing on the side.

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Now That’s What I Call Ars Technica, Volume 1: Favorite stories from Ars’ 20 years

Actually, I think that was a popular timepiece style when the site first started.

It’s true—Ars Technica is in the process of turning 20 years old throughout 2019. If you’ve ever looked at the whois info, our official birthday hits on December 29. But Ars was really birthed all throughout that first year, as Editor-in-Chief Ken Fisher (err, Caesar) and his fellow computer prosumers figured out how to start the most comprehensive PC enthusiast outlet around. “Our love for the PC is gonna lead us into bad, bad things like NT, Linux, and BeOS content under the same roof,” as the original Ars Mission Statement noted. “Please don’t report us!”

Since then, well, Ars has definitely expanded. You can find anything from LARPing to archaeology industry trends alongside the latest Linux review on the site today. But throughout these past two decades and the site’s numerous evolutions, Ars still feels like it has stuck with the ethos of that initial public declaration—”having fun, being productive, and being as informative and as accurate as possible,” as Caesar put it.

So to cap off this week (itself likely a small start to what will inevitably be numerous trips down memory lane during our 20th anniversary year), we recently polled the Ars community—aka, staff and readers—to find out what folks consider some of the site’s greatest hits. The first batch of story suggestions is below, but don’t be shy about starting a second list in the comments.

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How running websites has changed in the last two decades (for an Ars IT guru)

The Pit, a BBS door game. In this shot, Lee Hutchinson was attacking these guys. Or, maybe they're attacking him.

I was a true nerd growing up in the 1980s—not in the hipster way but in the 10-pound-issue-of-Computer-Shopperunder-my-arm way (these things were seriously huge). I was thoroughly addicted to BBSes (Bulletin Board Systems) by the time I was 10. Maybe it’s no surprise I ended up as a technical director for a science and tech site.

In fact, I’d actually draw a direct line between the job of managing your own BBS (aka SysOping) to managing a modern Web infrastructure. And with everyone around Ars looking back given the site’s 20th anniversary, let’s make that line a bit clearer. It won’t be an exhaustive history of websites, but here’s how my own experiences with managing websites have evolved in the past two decades—plus how the tools and thinking have changed over time, too.

LOAD “*”, 8, 1

My first SysOp experience was powered by a Commodore 128 (in 64 mode, of course) running Greg Pfountz’s Color 64 software. I sent Greg my check—well, my mom’s check—and received back a single 5.25-inch floppy diskette along with a hand-bound dotmatrix-printed manual. It was on.

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Dealmaster: Get big discounts on 4K TVs from Vizio, LG, and TCL

Dealmaster: Get big discounts on 4K TVs from Vizio, LG, and TCL

Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains, we have another round of deals to share. Today’s list is headlined by a handful of high-end 4K TV deals, with the likes of Vizio’s P-Series, TCL’s 6-Series Roku TVs, and LG’s B8 OLED TVs all on sale.

As we noted last year, we’re nearing the time when TV deals start to reach their apex. Black Friday has passed and this year’s models are getting introduced, which means prices on many of the still-great models of 2018 will gradually drop until they are discontinued for good. It’s very much possible that the TVs highlighted below will get even cheaper as the year goes on, but if you’re interested in grabbing a high-end 4K HDR TV ahead of the Super Bowl, have a look at the various deals below.

And if you don’t need a new TV, we also have deals on Black Ops 4, cheap wireless workout headphones, Echo devices, and more.

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Ars Technica turns 20 years old, and we couldn’t have done it without the community

If that image doesn't quite get the point across, a lot of wild stuff happens in the Ars forums.

If you’ve ever looked at the whois info for Ars Technica, you might already be in on a little secret: our birthday is December 29, 1998, making 2019 the site’s official 20th anniversary year. For a site that wanted to do “bad, bad things like NT, Linux, and BeOS content under the same roof,” that’s an impressive run—about 7.5 million .beats, or more than a lifetime in doge years.

As one of the longtime Arsians on present-day staff, I feel quite safe in saying that we wouldn’t have made it this far if not for our community. I’m not talking so much about the people who just leave comments to articles we publish, although proud we are of all of them. No, I’m specifically referring to those of you who inhabit the OpenForum. This one’s for all of you.

In the beginning, there was Caesar

Once upon a time, Web fora were a big thing, and the Ars OpenForum was one of the biggest. Sure, in the year 2018 they are a little slower-moving than the olden days, but back then people didn’t have some of those new upstarts like MySpace and app.net and Brightkite to draw away their attention. Forums overall may have slowly faded away, but not so around Ars. Even today with all of those other distractions people have online, things aren’t quite at ghost town level in the OpenForum. And when I put out the call for peoples’ reminiscences, the memories came flooding in.

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Dealmaster: Take $20 off an Xbox One Wireless Controller for your Xbox or PC

Dealmaster: Take $20 off an Xbox One Wireless Controller for your Xbox or PC

Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains, we have another round of deals to share. With today’s list, we’re highlighting a deal on Microsoft’s Xbox One Wireless Controller, which is down to $40 at Walmart and Amazon. That’s $20 off its standard going rate.

This is a good price for anyone in need of a spare controller for their Xbox One, but it also has its uses for those who game on the PC. While Xbox’s controller may be blasphemous to the most dedicated PC gamers, some people do prefer to use a gamepad over the tried-and-true mouse and keyboard. The Xbox One controller has the advantage of being easy to set up on Windows, since they’re both made by the same company. That could make it a better buy than Sony’s DualShock 4 controller for those who play PC games outside of Valve’s Steam client. (It does work with Steam just fine, though.) It can connect to a PC via Bluetooth or a microUSB cable.

The big difference between the Xbox One controller and the DS4 is that the former requires a pair of AA batteries for power. The upside is that the Xbox One pad tends to last longer per charge than the DualShock 4 and its built-in battery, but if you don’t have a dedicated battery charger, it can be a pain. Nevertheless, if you prefer the feel of the Xbox One controller and its asymmetrical joysticks, this is a solid deal.

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Dealmaster: Get a Samsung 860 EVO SSD for $68

Dealmaster: Get a Samsung 860 EVO SSD for $68

Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains, we have another round of deals to share. Today’s list is headlined by a new low on the 500GB model of Samsung’s 860 EVO SSD, which is currently down to $68.40 at Amazon with an on-site coupon.

It’s not the pinnacle of performance at this point, but the 860 EVO is still fast enough for those looking to upgrade an aging PC saddled with an HDD or complement a device whose existing solid-state drive is running out of space. While competing SATA drives like Crucial’s MX500 are currently available for a couple dollars less, the 860 EVO is a bit faster and generally more durable, so we think it’s worth buying when the price difference is this slight.

Beyond that, we also have deals on a variety of Nintendo Switch games and accessories, Apple’s HomePod, GoPro action cameras, and more. Have a look for yourself below.

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Dealmaster: Get post-Christmas deals on Amazon devices, iPads, and more

Dealmaster: Get post-Christmas deals on Amazon devices, iPads, and more

Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains, we have another round of deals to share. The Dealmaster hopes you and yours have had a wonderful holiday season, and now that most Christmas gifts have been opened it’s time to begin the annual cycle of discounts anew.

Predictably, there aren’t a ton of good tech deals going on in this awkward period between Christmas and New Year’s Day, but we’ve still rounded up a few noteworthy discounts on the likes of Amazon Echo and Fire devices, iPads, Apple Watches, Apple gift cards, the Google Home Hub, Anker portable batteries, HDMI cables, and much more. Have a look for yourself below.

Note: Ars Technica may earn compensation for sales from links on this post through affiliate programs.

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