iPhone X Production Faces Further Delays, Will Start in Mid-October

Final production on the iPhone X has yet to start, even though Apple will begin taking orders for the device in just over a month. Raymond James chip analyst Christopher Caso conducted supply chain checks this morning and then shared what he learned about Apple’s production schedule in an investor’s note obtained by Barron’s.

According to Caso, while there were already production delays affecting the iPhone X, further delays have occurred recently. He says production is set to start in mid-October, later than earlier predictions. With additional delays, full production ramp up will be delayed into the December quarter.

Interestingly, while the industry widely anticipated a shift in iPhone ramp timing, our checks suggest there was an incremental delay in the build plans – with orders firmed up as recently as last week – shifting production more into the December quarter.

While our checks are ongoing, initial feedback from our meetings suggests that final production of iPhone X has not yet begun, with production expected to commence in mid-October. That production start is about a month later when compared to expectations a month ago, and about 2 months later than expectations at the end of June. Notably, this is consistent with commentary from Diodes last week suggesting the timing had changed since reporting June quarter results and is important as it relates to tone and expectations for the December quarter.

We’ve already known the iPhone X is going to be severely constrained, but hints of further delays suggest supplies could be more restricted than originally thought.

With the iPhone 8 and the iPhone 8 Plus seemingly not garnering as much interest from customers as previous smartphones launched in fall, it seems there could be quite a lot of Apple fans who are holding out for the iPhone X.

It could be months before Apple has adequate supply to meet demand for the $999 device. Reliable KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, for example, has said it could take well into 2018 for Apple to fill all orders.

The iPhone X will be available for pre-order on October 27, with the device to officially launch on November 3. Pre-orders will undoubtedly sell out rapidly so all but the luckiest customers may need to wait for several weeks to get their hands on one of the new flagship devices.

The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, launching this Friday, should be readily available at retail stores around the world.

Related Roundup: iPhone X

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Craig Federighi: Apple Has Considered Nightstand Mode for iPhone X

Apple software engineering chief Craig Federighi has revealed that Apple has considered a Nightstand mode for iPhone X.



“This is definitely something we’ve considered,” said Federighi, in response to an email from MacRumors reader Zain. “This probably makes the most sense for customers who charge their phone in a dock that tilts up the phone.”

However, Federighi noted that it’s “not currently super common” for people to charge their iPhones that way.

Nightstand mode is an Apple Watch feature that allows the watch to be used as a nightstand clock and an alarm clock while it is laying on its side and charging. The watch displays the time in large text, along with the date, the battery’s remaining charge, and an upcoming alarm if one is set.

When the Apple Watch is in Nightstand mode and isn’t being used, the display turns off. To see the display again, users tap it, press the Digital Crown or the side button, or lightly nudge the Apple Watch. Sometimes, even nudging or tapping the nightstand or other surface the watch is sitting on works.

Since the iPhone X can’t be positioned on its side by itself, it could be placed on a wireless charging pad with an angled stand, like this one from RAVPower. Coupled with new tap to wake functionality for the display, the idea of a Nightstand mode for iPhone X could make sense.

Apple could add Nightstand mode to iPhone X in a future update to iOS 11, but it’s possible they’ve already dismissed the idea.

Federighi has been replying to several customer emails over the past week following Apple’s iPhone X event at Steve Jobs Theater.

Related Roundup: iPhone X
Tags: Craig Federighi, Nightstand mode

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Facial Recognition Startups Report Increased Interest in Their Tech After Apple’s Reveal of Face ID

With the upcoming launch of the iPhone X in November, Apple is preparing to debut an all-new biometric security feature called “Face ID.” By using half a dozen front-facing sensors and an enhanced camera system, the iPhone X will be able to project more than 30,000 invisible dots onto your face, create a precise map of what it sees, and remember it so that all you have to do to unlock the iPhone X is look at it with your eyes open, and swipe up on the Lock Screen.

Although it’s yet to be seen if this feature will be “well received” by users, a new report by Bloomberg today cites a few startups in the technology industry that have noticed Apple’s influence already beginning to make waves in the face-scanning technology market. These startups — which specialize in technology related to facial recognition systems — say they have “already seen a pickup in demand” from certain companies interested in their technology, starting soon after iPhone X event day on September 12.



George Brostoff, CEO of one such startup called Sensible Vision, told Bloomberg that Apple’s Face ID/iPhone X announcement “makes companies like Motorola, like LG come knocking on the doors of companies like ours.” Brostoff said that the company is now fielding calls from potential buyers, including talks with “virtually all of the world’s phone manufacturers,” with expectations set for the startup to be sold to one of these interested parties — which excludes Apple — within a year.

While not everyone will buy the $999 high-end iPhone, rival electronics makers are already trying to figure out how they can incorporate the technology in their offerings. Startups selling their own versions of facial recognition say they’ve already seen a pickup in demand since Sept. 12, when Apple announced the iPhone X, aka 10.

“We now have a leader like Apple acknowledging that this makes sense,” said George Brostoff, chief executive officer of SensibleVision Inc., a Cape Coral, Florida-based startup that makes software for tablets and smartphones. “This makes companies like Motorola, like LG come knocking on the doors of companies like ours.”

Looking forward, research firm Crone Consulting LLC reported that facial recognition will account for “more than half of all [device] log-ins” over the next three to five years, including users authorizing mobile banking apps and payments. In terms of earnings, researchers at MarketsandMarkets predicted that the market for Face ID-like biometric security systems will double from the $3.35 billion it made in 2016, to $6.84 billion in 2021.

Apple software engineering chief Craig Federighi has made the rounds since the September 12 keynote event, assuring users that Face ID is “incredibly reliable,” “very fast,” and it “just works.” He’s said that he understands user uncertainty over the new feature, but these concerns will “melt away” once they get the iPhone X in their hands. In terms of security, Apple has also said that your face is saved only to the iPhone X and not accessible by anyone who doesn’t have access to the device.

According to Federighi, all of these behind-the-scenes Face ID features come together flawlessly: “You don’t even think about it,” he said.

Related Roundup: iPhone X
Tags: bloomberg.com, Face ID

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Kuo: If Face ID is ‘Well Received,’ It’s Likely 2018 iPhones Will Fully Adopt TrueDepth Camera

KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo this afternoon published a new research note for investors where he speculates about what Apple might do in future iPhones regarding Touch ID and Face ID. Investors, like many of us, are curious whether Apple plans to eliminate Touch ID in favor of Face ID, embrace a dual biometric solution, or swap back to Touch ID once a viable under display solution is available.

Kuo believes Apple’s future plans will hinge on whether or not Face ID is well received by the public.

A key question on the minds of many investors is whether the new iPhone models to be launched in 2018 will support Touch ID (fingerprint recognition). We believe the key factors are: (1) whether or not Face ID (facial recognition) of iPhone X provide a positive user experience; and (2) the technical issues that Apple (US) will have to address with an under-display fingerprint solution. We believe Apple will replace the existing Home button-based Touch ID with the under-display solution for higher screen-to-body ratios, if it decides to bring back Touch ID.

Should Face ID be well received by consumers who purchase the iPhone X, Kuo believes there’s a higher likelihood 2018 iPhone models will adopt the TrueDepth Camera and support Face ID.

Should Apple choose to return to Touch ID as either a dual biometric solution or a Face ID replacement should Face ID not fare well, Kuo believes any forthcoming Touch ID option will be built under the iPhone’s display. 3D Touch, though, will make it challenging for Apple to develop an under-display solution.

This is because the iPhone’s 3D Touch module makes the entire panel module even thicker, and could potentially undermine the scan-through performance of the under-display solution. If Face ID fails to impress consumers, Apple may turn its focus to the development of under-display solution. However, even if that happens, Apple will still have to find ways to overcome the aforementioned technical issue.

If Face ID does indeed go over well with consumers and makes its way into additional iOS devices in 2018, Kuo believes Apple’s Android competitors will make an effort to speed up facial recognition development, boosting manufacturers who supply facial recognition components.

Face ID will be in the hands of consumers this November, following the launch of the iPhone X. As Face ID is a new biometric system, there have been a lot of questions and doubts about privacy, security, and functionality, but Apple’s Craig Federighi has attempted to alleviate the uncertainty with a series of interviews.

In a recent discussion with Daring Fireball‘s John Gruber, Federighi said that once Face ID is in the hands of consumers, all of that uncertainty will just “melt away.” The feature “just works,” he says. “You don’t even have to think about it.”

Related Roundup: iPhone X

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How Qi wireless charging works, and why it hasn’t taken over yet

The Qi wireless charging standard from the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) is having a relatively good year. Now is a good time for a bird’s-eye view of the technology—how it works, what it’s for, and what its prospects are. This is also a good time because millions of Apple ecosystem users are about to get their first sampling of Qi when the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus launch this Friday.

Qi has appeared in phones of various stripes for more than five years, and many people are already using it. The basic tech has been used for consumer products like razors and toothbrushes for a while, plus a variety of non-consumer tools.

Even if you haven’t used Qi, you may have seen Qi wireless charge pads at airports. In 2014, Verizon installed Qi wireless charging stations in several US terminals, from JFK to LAX. You’ll find them in plenty of other places, too, including devices like the Samsung Galaxy S8 and the US version of the LG G6.

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Pi Charger Uses Qi Standard to Extend Wireless Charging Reach Beyond Current Mats

With the launch of the iPhone 8 and iPhone X, Apple added inductive wireless charging support to its mobile devices for the first time. While the feature brought Apple’s phones up to speed with existing Qi-compatible charging standards, the announcement fell short of some expectations that this year Apple would introduce technology allowing iPhones to be powered wirelessly at a distance, rather than having to use a charging mat.

However, Pi is a California-based startup that aims to break from that limitation with the Pi Charger – a cone-shaped tabletop device that combines Qi-based resonant induction with a special beam-forming algorithm that allows it to charge multiple devices within about a foot in any direction.



The Pi might not reach the distances claimed by Energous’ WattUp technology, which uses radio frequencies to charge devices from up to 15 feet away, but it does offer more flexibility than existing pads that devices must be directly placed upon.

In a demo at TechCrunch‘s Disrupt event, the company showed that up to four Qi-compatible devices can be placed within a foot of a Pi and they will start charging. Devices can be located anywhere within a 12-inch sphere of influence around the charging hub and in different orientations. The closer the device to the Pi, the faster it charges, with a gradual drop-off in charging speed the further away the phone is.

“Magnetic fields are the best way to send meaningful energy to phones, tablets, and other portable electronics,” said Lixin Shi, Pi’s CTO and co-founder. “The hard part was figuring out how to make magnetic charging more flexible, multi-device, and extend its useful range. It took us over a year to complete the mathematical proof that makes it all possible.”

The team behind Pi said they’ve yet to settle on an exact price for the charger, but they expect it to ship for under $200 sometime in 2018. As for Apple, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest it has partnered with Energous to work on bringing a truly wire-free, over-the-air charging technology to its consumer devices, but we’ll likely have to wait for at least another year to see the possible fruits of those labors.

Related Roundups: iPhone 8, iPhone X
Tags: wireless charging, Qi, Pi
Buyer’s Guide: iPhone (Buy Now)

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‘infltr’ Photo Editing App Now Lets You Edit Photos Taken in Apple’s Portrait Mode

Photo editing app infltr received an update on Monday that allows users to apply customizable filters to images and Live Photos containing depth information, or pictures taken in Apple’s dual-camera Portrait Mode.

In version 2.10 of infltr (short for “infinite filters”), users who capture a photo on an iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8 Plus or iPhone X using Portrait Mode are now able to toggle between the foreground and background to make separate edits to the two layers. infltr’s developers describe it like so:

On top of the colour information red, blue, green and alpha which makes a classic photo, if the photo is captured with depth enabled, an extra layer of information can be seen as a 3D map of the captured scene.


This depth layer is leveraged by infltr to let you edit the background and foreground of your photos differently. This is extremely powerful and integrates seamlessly within infltr’s editor, allowing you to get more creative and highlight the region of your image that matters the most to you.

infltr offers more than 7 million possible filters thanks to a color gradient mapping algorithm, and lets users choose a filter before they take a picture or record video. Moving a finger in any direction over the screen causes the photo filter to change its hue, while double-tapping shuffles the filter for a random pot-luck effect.

infltr can be used to edit photos, videos, animated GIFs, and DSLR shots in HD without a loss in resolution, using over 10 included adjustment and transform tools. Users can also apply infltr filters to the live camera feed while in iMessage.



As well as the ability to edit Portrait Mode photos, the latest update brings support for iOS 11, including the ability to edit photos stored in the new Files app, support for Drag and Drop, an improved iMessage app, new album management options, and the ability to revert filtered photos to their original version from the Camera Roll.

infltr costs $1.99 and can be downloaded for iPad and iPhone (with Apple Watch support) from the App Store [Direct Link], although Apple is still offering users of its official Apple Store app special redeem codes to download infltr for free until October 1 [Direct Link]. The infltr offer can be found in the Discover section on the main store screen.

Related Roundups: iPhone 7, iPhone 8, iPhone X
Tag: infltr
Buyer’s Guide: iPhone (Buy Now), iPhone (Buy Now)

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iPhone 8 and iPhone X Don’t Support T-Mobile’s Upcoming 600 MHz LTE Network

Apple’s iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are not compatible with LTE Band 71, aka T-Mobile’s new 600 MHz spectrum the company plans on rolling out in the United States as soon as this year.

All new iPhone models in the United States support FDD-LTE Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 28, 29, 30, and 66, and TD-LTE bands 4, 38, 39, 40, and 41, according to the Tech Specs page for the devices.

Support for additional bands can’t be added retroactively, so Apple’s devices will not work with LTE Band 71 until support is added to future iPhones.



T-Mobile purchased the 600 MHz spectrum in an FCC auction in April of 2017. Shortly after, T-Mobile announced plans to use the spectrum to deliver 5G coverage starting in 2019, but later said it would use the spectrum to improve its network in rural America starting this year.

Unfortunately, by the time T-Mobile purchased the spectrum and announced plans for rapid implementation, the LTE chips and the hardware for the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X were likely already secured, giving Apple no time to build in support for a newly announced LTE band.



T-Mobile in August activated the first 600 MHz LTE site in Cheyenne, Wyoming and has said it will deploy the spectrum at a “record-shattering pace” with plans to roll out 600 MHz sites in Wyoming, Northwest Oregon, West Texas, Southwest Kansas, the Oklahoma panhandle, Western North Dakota, Maine, Coastal North Carolina, Central Pennsylvania, Central Virginia, and Eastern Washington, but whether T-Mobile will hit that goal and get 600 MHz support in those locations by the end of 2017 remains to be seen.

As Peter Cohen points out, deploying the 600 MHz network is a complicated, time-consuming process that will span several years, so most iPhone 8, 8 Plus, and X users won’t be heavily affected by the lack of support for the new LTE band at this time.

Like every other carrier, T-Mobile is entirely dependent on a nationwide industry of independent cellular tower owners, operators and technicians to get their hardware deployed. Even if T-Mobile had unlimited funds to get a 600 MHz network up and running, there simply aren’t enough people in the industry who can climb the towers, install the new hardware, test it and get it working for them. What we’re talking about is a huge infrastructure effort that goes way beyond just flipping a switch and turning it on.

T-Mobile says Band 71 adds increased building penetration and covers greater distances. When used in metro areas, it improves in-building coverage, and in rural areas, it improves the company’s LTE footprint.

There are no existing devices that support T-Mobile’s new spectrum at this time. Like Apple’s newest devices, for example, Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and new Galaxy Note 8 do not offer support. T-Mobile has said that LG and Samsung will launch devices compatible with the spectrum by the end of the year, and LG’s upcoming LG V30 will be one of the first devices to support it.

Related Roundups: iPhone 8, iPhone X
Tag: T-Mobile
Buyer’s Guide: iPhone (Buy Now)

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