Hands-On With the OnePlus 7 Pro’s New Pop-Up Camera and Bezel-Free Display

OnePlus today unveiled its latest flagship smartphone, the OnePlus 7 Pro, which offers an impressive feature set at a price that beats out flagship devices from other smartphone manufacturers, including Apple.

We were able to go hands-on with the OnePlus 7 Pro at the OnePlus event this morning, so we thought we’d give MacRumors readers a look at the bezel-free display and pop-up camera, both of which are great smartphone features.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.


The OnePlus 7 Pro is all display, with a 6.67-inch OLED screen that takes up the entire front of the device. There are no camera cutouts or notches on the display at all, and that’s because OnePlus is using a nifty little front-facing camera that pops out of the back of the phone when you want to use it.



It’s a feature that’s unique to the OnePlus device, and it allows for an edge-to-edge top-to-bottom bezel-free display without sacrificing the selfie camera. The little pop out camera seems rather durable, though we’ll have to see how it holds up over time.

OnePlus uploaded a video demonstrating the camera opening and closing more than 300,000 times (it’s 12 hours long!) and another video that demonstrated it lifting up a rock, so it certainly seems to be able to hold up to abuse.



Though it’s got a 6.67-inch display, the OnePlus 7 Pro is similar in size to the iPhone XS Max, just because there’s no bezels to deal with. The display does curve around the edges of the device, which some may not like, but it looks undeniably good.

OnePlus calls the display a “Fluid AMOLED” display because it has a 90Hz refresh rate, a concept similar to the 120Hz refresh rate on the iPad Pro models. That refresh rate is more noticeable on a smaller device, and scrolling through the OS is super smooth.



Aside from the standout display and the unique pop-up front-facing camera, the OnePlus 7 Pro has some pretty decent specs. There’s a triple-lens camera with telephoto, wide-angle, and ultra wide-angle lenses, an under-display fingerprint sensor, a Snapdragon 855 chip, up to 12GB RAM, up to 256GB storage, a 4,000mAh battery, and a fast charging feature.

On the downside, the OnePlus 7 Pro doesn’t offer wireless charging like many other smartphones on the market, nor does it have an Ingress Protection rating for water resistance. And of course there’s one other major downside for Apple fans — it runs Android.



OnePlus is charging more for this year’s flagship OnePlus smartphone, and the 7 Pro is priced starting at $669. That’s still quite a bit cheaper than the iPhone XS and flagship smartphones from other companies like Samsung, even though it’s using some pretty high-end hardware.

What do you think of the OnePlus 7 Pro and the pop-up selfie cam? Let us know in the comments. We’ll be taking a closer look at the OnePlus 7 Pro and comparing it to the iPhone XS Max in a future video, so keep an eye out for that.

This article, "Hands-On With the OnePlus 7 Pro's New Pop-Up Camera and Bezel-Free Display" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

New ‘ZombieLoad’ Vulnerability Affects Intel Chips Dating Back to 2011, Apple to Release Patch

Security researchers have discovered a new set of vulnerabilities that affect Intel chips dating back to 2011, including the chips that have been used in Apple devices.

As outlined by TechCrunch, “ZombieLoad,” as it’s being called, consists of four bugs that can allow hackers to exploit the design flaws in the chips to steal sensitive information directly from the processor.



These vulnerabilities are as serious as the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities that were discovered in early 2018 and take advantage of the same speculative execution process, which is designed to speed up data processing and performance.

A white paper shared by notable security researchers (including some who worked on Spectre and Meltdown) offers details on how ZombieLoad functions. [PDF]

While programs normally only see their own data, a malicious program can exploit the fill buffers to get hold of secrets currently processed by other running programs. These secrets can be user-level secrets, such as browser history, website content, user keys, and passwords, or system-level secrets, such as disk encryption keys.

The attack does not only work on personal computers but can also be exploited in the cloud.

ZombieLoad impacts almost every Intel computer dating back to 2011, but AMD and ARM chips are not affected. A demonstration of ZombieLoad was shared on YouTube, displaying how it works to see what you’re doing on your computer. While spying on web browsing is demoed, it can also be used for other purposes like stealing passwords.



There have been no reports of hackers taking advantage of the ZombieLoad vulnerabilities at this time, and Intel has released microcode for vulnerable processors. Apple is expected to release a patch for ZombieLoad “in the coming hours,” with Google and Microsoft also planning patches.

According to Intel, its microcode updates will have an impact on processor performance, but it’s not clear if that’s also true for Apple devices, which did not see significant slowdowns for the Meltdown and Spectre patches.

An Intel spokesperson told TechCrunch that most patched consumer devices could take a 3 percent performance hit at worst, and as much as 9 percent in a datacenter environment. But, the spokesperson said, it was unlikely to be noticeable in most scenarios.

One of the researchers who discovered ZombieLoad, Daniel Gruss, told TechCrunch that ZombieLoad is easier to exploit than Spectre, but more difficult than Meltdown, and that it requires a specific set of skills, which means the average person doesn’t need to worry.

This article, "New 'ZombieLoad' Vulnerability Affects Intel Chips Dating Back to 2011, Apple to Release Patch" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Proposed Tariffs Could Lead to 14% Increase in U.S. iPhone Prices

While U.S. tariffs on Apple’s chargers and cases are already at 25 percent, the company’s main products like the iPhone have so far escaped the extra taxes. That may soon change, however, as the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has begun the approval process to subject an additional $300 billion in Chinese-made products, including iPhones, to tariffs that could go into effect in late June.



The proposed tariffs are largely a bargaining chip and could end up being avoided if deals can be struck between the Trump administration and the Chinese government, but if the tariffs were to take effect, their impact on Apple’s business would be substantial. Analysts cited by CNBC outline Apple’s options, with J.P. Morgan estimating that the tariffs would be equivalent an estimated 14 percent increase in the retail price of an iPhone XS, pushing the cost from $999 to $1,142.

“We estimate a price increase of around 14% is required to absorb the impact of a 25% tariff, keeping margin dollars for all players in the supply chain constant,” J.P. Morgan said in a note to clients Tuesday.

There are a variety of ways that impact could be handled, including price increases for consumers, Apple absorbing the tariffs, suppliers helping absorb the tariffs by cutting the prices they charge Apple, or some combination of those possibilities.

Looking further down the road, some have suggested Apple could move iPhone production out of China in order to avoid tariffs, either to other countries in the region or to the United States. Such a move would require massive investment and take a substantial amount of time, however, and Bank of America Merrill Lynch estimates that iPhone prices would have to increase by around 20 percent if production was moved to the U.S.

“We estimate the incremental cost of manufacturing iPhones in the U.S. could be 15-25%, and, if passed on to consumers could lead to demand destruction, in our view,” the Bank of America said in a note.

Apple’s stock is down about 10 percent over the past two weeks as concerns over the Chinese trade dispute have roiled the markets in general and Apple in particular. Yesterday’s Supreme Court ruling that allowed a lawsuit claiming Apple has monopolized the retail app market with the App Store to proceed also appears to have contributed to the recent drop in Apple’s stock price.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

This article, "Proposed Tariffs Could Lead to 14% Increase in U.S. iPhone Prices" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Tariff on Apple Chargers and Cases Jumps Now at 25%

Apple products have largely escaped the tariffs imposed on goods manufactured in China, but since earlier this year, Apple accessories like power adapters, cables, and cases have been subject to a 10 percent fee.

As noted by The Verge, the United States on Friday raised import taxes from 10 percent to 25 percent, a tax increase that’s going to impact these Apple accessories.



Thus far, Apple and its suppliers have absorbed the additional 10 percent fee on Apple accessories and prices have not gone up, but with tariffs now at 25 percent, it’s not yet clear if Apple will continue to eat the extra cost.

Apple may be making enough money to continue to sell its accessories at a normal cost, and as The Verge points out, it could have shifted manufacturing to different countries to avoid the fees all together. Apple has not commented on the extra tariffs at this point in time.

China today retaliated and announced increased tariffs on $60 billion in U.S. goods, which will take effect in June. China will be introducing import fees on petrochemicals, soy oil, peanut oil, and more.

Apple CEO Tim Cook last July said that Apple is hoping “calm heads prevail” and that the company is “optimistic” the tariff issue will be sorted out. That hasn’t happened yet, but so far, the bulk of Apple products continue to be unaffected.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

This article, "Tariff on Apple Chargers and Cases Jumps Now at 25%" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple CEO Tim Cook talks WWDC student program, coding initiatives and SAP

For the past few years, Apple has been inviting student developers to attend its WWDC conference, which centers on development topics and software. A few students from this year’s batch are getting some more personal attention from Apple as it tries to raise awareness of the program and coding literacy via its Swift Playgrounds and other resources for students and teachers.

Most of those students, though, won’t get a surprise personal visit from CEO Tim Cook, which is what happened this week when Lyman High School student Liam Rosenfeld got to the Millenia Mall Apple Store in Orlando, Florida. Liam was there to participate, he thought, in an interview with myself and a local journalist from the Orlando Sentinel about his admission to the program.

As a surprise, and fresh off an appearance at the SAP Sapphire conference to announce an expanded partnership, Cook came to visit the store to greet employees, and to spend some time with Liam and his teacher, Mary Acken.

I was on hand to spend some time of my own with Liam, to talk to him about his experiences coding in high school and shipping on a global App Store. I also spoke to Cook about coding literacy, the SAP partnership and some other interesting topics.

The confab was set for Wednesday afternoon, with the store making an ideal meeting place given its rough proximity to the conference and airport. Liam arrived earlier than expected and some interference had to be ran so that Cook’s appearance and the surprise, could be kept secret.

Very Rare Original iPod in Factory Sealed Box Hits eBay for $19,995

If you missed the opportunity to buy the original iPod nearly 18 years ago, now is your second chance — but it won’t be cheap.



A very rare first-generation iPod factory sealed in its “unopened original box” in “unopened original shrink wrap” has surfaced in a new eBay listing with an asking price of $19,995, over 50 times more than the $399 it cost when it was first unveiled by the late Steve Jobs in October 2001.

Jobs famously pitched the original iPod as offering “1,000 songs in your pocket.” The iconic device features a 5GB hard drive, a two-inch grayscale LCD screen, up to 10 hours of battery life, a FireWire port, and a scroll wheel for “simple, one-handed navigation.” Its 0.75-inch thickness was slim at the time.



It’s hard to say exactly how many factory-sealed original iPods are still in existence, but there are likely not many, and they rarely go on sale. When they do, they often fetch large sums, with the $19,995 price for this listing in line with an original iPod that reportedly sold for $20,000 on eBay back in 2014.

Bids are open on eBay.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with eBay. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a payment, which helps us keep the site running.

This article, "Very Rare Original iPod in Factory Sealed Box Hits eBay for $19,995" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple Watch Series 4 Wins ‘Displays of the Year’ Award

The Apple Watch Series 4 was today named one of the Displays of the Year by The Society for Information Display (SID) during the 2019 Display Industry Awards announced at Display Week, a yearly symposium and trade show.

The Displays of the Year awards highlight “the high-quality innovative work taking place in the display industry at every level.” The specific category the watch won focuses on “the most significant technological advances and/or outstanding features.”



The Apple Watch Series 4 received an award because it features an OLED display that’s 30 percent larger than the previous display, without an increase in device size. Additionally, it uses a new display technology called LTPO for improved efficiency, leading to longer battery life.

While retaining the original signature design, the fourth-generation Apple Watch has been refined, combining new hardware and software enhancements into a singular, unified form. The striking display, which is more than 30 percent larger at 40 mm or 44 mm, depending on the model, seamlessly integrates into the thinner, smaller case, while the new interface provides more information with richer detail. The display is the defining feature of Apple Watch, and Series 4 pushes that feature farther than ever. The challenge for designers was to make the display bigger without noticeably increasing the size of the case or compromising the battery life. Narrower borders enable a viewing area that’s more than 30 percent larger, while a new display technology called LTPO improves power efficiency, helping users get through the day on a single charge.

The 2019 awards cover products that were available for purchase during the 2018 calendar year, and no other Apple devices received awards this year. Last year, both the iPhone X and iPad Pro won “Displays of the Year” awards.

Other 2019 winners include Samsung for “The Wall” modular microLED 8K display, and Sony for its Crystal LED Display System that also uses microLED technology.

This article, "Apple Watch Series 4 Wins 'Displays of the Year' Award" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

iTunes and App Stores Suffering Outage

The iTunes Store, App Store, Apple Books, and the Mac App Store are experiencing an outage, according to Apple’s System Status page.

Some customers may be unable to make purchases, which is in line with reports about downtime on Twitter. We’ve also heard complaints about Apple Music and other services, though Apple isn’t listing problems outside of the App Stores.

Apple’s developer website confirms that TestFlight and App Store Connect are affected as well, so developers and testers may be unable to use these services at the current time.

The outage has been ongoing since 1:40 a.m. Pacific Time, and it’s not clear how many customers are affected. We don’t know when the issues will be fixed, but we’ll update this post when all services are up and running.

This article, "iTunes and App Stores Suffering Outage" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums