Medical records join revenge porn, credit card numbers for Google removal

Alphabet Inc.’s Google has now added personal medical records to the list of things it’s willing to remove from search results upon request.

Starting this week, individuals can ask Google to delete from search results “confidential, personal medical records of private people” that have been posted without consent. The quiet move, reported by Bloomberg, adds medical records to the short list of things that Google polices, including revenge porn, sites containing content that violates copyright laws, and those with personal financial information, including credit card numbers.

The policy change appears aptly timed. Earlier this month, a congressionally mandated task force—The Health Care Industry Cybersecurity Task Force report—reported that all aspects of health IT security are in critical condition. And last month, the WannaCry ransomware worm affected 65 hospitals in the UK.

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Google Will Stop Scanning Your Emails to Show Personalized Ads in Gmail

Google today announced that it will stop scanning the emails of its free Gmail users for the purpose of delivering personalized ads later this year.



If you’ve recently received a lot of emails about photography or cameras, for example, currently Google may show you a deal from a local camera store that it thinks might be interesting to you. On the other hand, if you’ve reported those emails as spam, then Google would take steps not to show those ads.

Google users may still see personalized ads while using Gmail and the company’s other services, depending on their account settings, but the contents of a user’s inbox will no longer factor into the ads that are shown.

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