Hannah TV adaptation sacrifices magic of original film for typical teen angst

Esme Creed-Miles plays the titular teen assassin in Amazon Prime's new series, <em>Hannah</em>.

An isolated teenaged girl genetically engineered to be an assassin must elude rogue CIA agents intent on terminating her in Hannah, Amazon’s adaption of the 2011 film of the same name. It’s a gritty, competent thriller, with strong performances from a talented cast, and has already been renewed for a second season. The problem is that no matter how much one tries to separate the series from the film, comparisons are inevitable. And in almost all respects, the TV adaptation comes up short.

(Some spoilers for the series and the 2011 film below.)

Not everyone was a fan of Director Joe Wright’s original film, with its strange mix of revenge thriller and dark coming-of-age fairytale. But it’s one of my recent favorites for precisely those elements, driven by an exquisitely unsettling performance by Saoirse Ronan in the titular role. Ronan had this otherworldly presence of untouched innocence, combined with a ruthless hunter’s instinct, as we saw in the very first scene when she kills and dresses a deer with just a bow and arrow and a hunting knife.

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Happy 30th B-Day, Game Boy: Here are six reasons why you’re #1

Thirty years ago this week, Nintendo released the Game Boy, its first handheld video game console. Excited Japanese customers snatched up the innovative monochrome handheld by the thousands, which retailed for 12,500 yen (about $94 at 1989 rates) at launch—a small price to pay for what seemed to be an NES in your pocket. Nintendo initially offered four games for the new Game Boy: Super Mario Land, Baseball, Alleyway, and Yakuman (a mahjong game), but the number of available titles quickly grew into the hundreds.

Later that year, the Game Boy hit the US at $89.99 with a secret weapon—Tetris as its pack-in game. Selling over a million units during the first Christmas season, the Game Boy proved equally successful in the US, and that success was by no means short-lived: to date, Nintendo has sold 118.69 million units of the original Game Boy line (not including Game Boy Advance) worldwide, making it the longest running dynasty in the video game business. So in honor of the Game Boy’s twentieth (Editor’s note: now thirtieth!) anniversary, we give you six reasons why the Game Boy dominated the handheld video game market during most of its astounding multi-decade run.

1. Tetris

It’s common pop-marketing knowledge these days that every new hardware platform needs a “killer app” to truly succeed. In the Game Boy’s case, Tetris filled that role perfectly.

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Review: Santa Clarita Diet S3 blends slapstick, satire with genuine heart

Sheila (Drew Barrymore) and Joel (Tim Olyphant) Hammond are married real estate agents with an undead secret.

The Santa Clarita Diet, Netflix’s smart, slyly satiric sitcom about a zombie outbreak in suburban Southern California, has largely flown under the pop culture radar since it debuted in February 2017. And that’s a shame, because it’s easily one of the best half-hour comedies on TV right now. Season 3 brought the same winning blend of satire, snappy dialogue, slapstick, and of course, plenty of zombie-munching gore.

(Some spoilers below.)

The series centers on Joel and Sheila Hammond (Tim Olyphant and Drew Barrymore), married real estate agents in Santa Clarita who find their lives irrevocably altered after Sheila has an extreme upchucking incident while showing a house to prospective clients. She thinks it’s a bad case of food poisoning but soon begins to crave human flesh. The upside: she feels better than she has in years, and her increased libido kick-starts the Hammonds’ previously humdrum sex life into overdrive. Season 1 was a bit uneven, especially in the earlier episodes, but the show found its stride by the end of that first 10-episode run, and both seasons 2 and 3 are sheer bingeable delights.

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Review: The indestructible humanity of A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World

Warning: Mild spoilers ahead.

Dystopian stories take many forms, but it’s a rare dystopian novel that prominently features man’s best friend. Author of the Oversight and Stoneheart trilogies, C.A. Fletcher doesn’t hide the importance of dogs in his latest novel. Aptly titled A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World, it follows a young boy named Griz as he goes on a journey to retrieve his stolen pet.

“Dogs were with us from the very beginning,” Griz writes. “And those that remain are still with us now, here at the end of the world.”

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Notre Dame donation leads to flood of positive Assassin’s Creed reviews

The famous cathedral lives on in interactive digital form.

At this point, we’re actually a little tired of stories about “review bombing,” where various put-upon groups of gamers gather together to leave a flood a negative user reviews, often for issues that have nothing to do with the game itself. But this week’s flood of positive reviews for Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed Unity on Steam is a different (and much rarer) story altogether.

The impetus for this reverse review-bomb (Review rocket? Review scaffolding? Review hug?) came earlier this week after the tragic fire in Paris’ Notre Dame cathedral. On Wednesday, Ubisoft announced it would be donating €500,000 to help rebuild the cathedral that’s recreated as a central landmark in Assassin’s Creed Unity. On top of that, the company is giving away free copies of the game on its UPlay platform through April 25 as a way to encourage further donations and in order “to give everyone the chance to experience the majesty and beauty of Notre-Dame the best way we know how.”

“When we created Assassin’s Creed Unity, we developed an even closer connection with this incredible city and its landmarks,” the company wrote this week. “One of the most notable elements of the game was the extraordinary recreation of Notre-Dame… We hope, with this small gesture, we can provide everyone an opportunity to appreciate our virtual homage to this monumental piece of architecture.”

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World of Goo is Epic Game Store’s next freebie—and all PC owners will get HD update

The Goo is back! And free! And updated for existing owners! Everyone wins, we think.

As has become a regular occurrence lately, Epic Games announced another solid free video game coming to all of its Epic Games Store (EGS) users, which has so far been an every-two-weeks promo for the relatively new storefront. And again, as has become a regular occurrence, the news came with some confusing crossover with Steam, the mega-ton retailer that EGS is not-so-subtly taking on.

Friday’s announcement confirmed that the award-winning puzzle game World of Goo, which launched in 2008 on PC and the Wii before reaching other platforms, will become an EGS freebie starting May 2. Users will have a two-week window to log in and claim a copy of the game (which currently retails for $10 at Steam and other digital-download storefronts).

Shortly after Epic’s announcement, a PC Gamer report clarified one key detail: this version of World of Goo includes a significant “framework” update with an emphasis on higher resolutions. However, that report didn’t answer if that update was an EGS exclusive—the kind of update that would require the game’s existing fans to log into a second storefront and claim a free copy—or when exactly its Steam equivalent will get the update.

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Gearbox’s Pitchford: Steam may be “a dying store” in 5 to 10 years

"You can't get us on Steam, and that's a good thing."

Earlier this month, Gearbox drew some ire from Steam-loving Borderlands fans by announcing the next game in the series, due in September, would be exclusive to the Epic Games Store on PC. In a massive tweet thread earlier this week, though (helpfully collated in this reddit post), Gearbox founder and CEO Randy Pitchford defends that decision and highlights what he sees as the long-term positives that Epic’s competition with Steam will bring to the industry.

While acknowledging that Epic’s platform currently lacks many quality-of-life features available on Steam, Pitchford pointed to Epic’s public road map for adding many of those features before September’s Borderlands 3 launch. In fact, Pitchford sees the game’s impending release as a “forcing function… that will, in turn, make all those features available on a faster timeline than otherwise possible… If I were to bet on this… Epic will inevitably surpass Valve on features and quality of service.”

Pitchford acknowledges that publisher 2K and developer Gearbox could have hedged their bets by releasing on both Steam and Epic. But he added that he feels the entire industry will be better served in the long run if Borderlands 3‘s exclusivity can help make the Epic Games Store competitive with Steam. (The sizable investment Epic has made in paying to get exclusive content on its store probably didn’t hurt, either)

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Iron Man VR preview makes me want to put on nerdy headgear again

Trailer for PSVR game Marvel’s Iron Man VR

AUSTIN, Texas—In some ways, I am the worst candidate among the Ars Technica gaming braintrust to demo the world premiere of Iron Man VR, a video game slated to launch on PlayStation VR by the end of this year. I have never used a PSVR, let alone any VR headset between the pricey HTC Vive and the build-it-yourself Nintendo Labo VR. And I’m an inconsistent Marvel movie follower at best. If we don’t count the early 2000s Spider-Man trilogy, Black Panther is my only MCU reference point.

But maybe that actually makes me the best candidate to fake like Tony Stark via a bulky headset. There is no veneer of VR snobbery to rely on. Instead, I had simple questions: Is this fun? Would I do it again, and for longer?

After a 20-minute(ish) flight test with a rep from the devs at Camouflaj (the studio behind the upcoming PSVR game) nearby, I can still confidently say the old X-Men co-op arcade cabinet remains my favorite Marvel game of all-time. But I would absolutely be down to fly around a bit more in Iron Man’s ruby-red armor soon, which is probably good news for millions of VR and Marvel novices who might be intrigued by the possibility of becoming their own living-room Iron Person.

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