iMac Pro Compared to 5K iMac and MacBook Pro

MacRumors videographer Dan recently got his hands on the new 8-core iMac Pro, and he decided to compare it to his other machines, a 2015 5K iMac and a 2016 MacBook Pro to see how it measures up when it comes to his everyday video editing workload.

In the video below, Dan takes a look at how well the iMac Pro performs on tasks like editing video, exporting video, and reading and writing data. If you’re wondering whether the entry-level iMac Pro is worth the $5,000 price tag when you’ve already got hardware on hand like an iMac or a MacBook Pro, this video is worth checking out because it might help you make a decision.

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Dan compared the entry-level 8-core iMac Pro with a 3.2GHz Intel Xeon W processor to a late 2015 iMac with a 3.2GHz 6th-generation Intel processor, 24GB RAM, 1TB Fusion Drive, and AMD Radeon M390 graphics card and a late 2016 MacBook Pro with a 2.7GHz 6th-generation Intel processor, 16GB RAM, 256GB SSD, and AMD Radeon Pro 455 graphics card.

Unsurprisingly, the iMac Pro was much faster when it came to benchmarks and performance tasks, and compared to the iMac and the MacBook Pro, the overall experience is smoother due to the sheer power of the processor and the GPU. It’s ultra quick when editing video, even with multiple system intensive apps open, and it’s quiet as a mouse with no loud fans.

The 5K iMac did win out slightly on video exporting time over the iMac Pro, but the iMac Pro wasn’t far behind and it came out on top in all other tests.

Pricing on the iMac Pro starts at $4,999 for the entry-level 8-core model with 32GB 2666 MHz ECC RAM, a 1TB SSD, and a Radeon Pro Vega 56 graphics card, but goes up to $13,199 depending on the upgrades you choose. Even at $4,999 it’s a couple thousand dollars more expensive than an iMac or a MacBook Pro, but it has the potential to be fully worth the asking price if you do system intensive creative work like video editing.

For more details on the iMac Pro, make sure to check out our iMac Pro roundup.
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How to Add a Quick Drawing or Sketch to an Email in the Mail App in iOS 11

In iOS 11, Apple introduced a new feature that lets you add a quick drawing or sketch to an email message right within the Mail app. It’s a simple, easy-to-access feature, but it’s a little bit hidden, so you might not know that it exists.



Here’s how you can get to the built-in drawing tools in the Mail app on an iPhone or iPad:

  1. Open up the Mail app.
  2. Compose a new email or reply to an existing email.
  3. In the body of the email, tap to bring up the options menu.
  4. Tap the arrow at the right of the options menu twice.
  5. Select “Insert Drawing.”

That’s all there is to it. Once you’ve selected “Insert Drawing,” you’ll be taken to a blank screen with a variety of simple drawing tools like a pen, pencil, marker, and eraser, along with a selection of colors to use.

Create your drawing using the provided tools, and when finished, tap the “Done” button and it’ll be inserted right into the body of your email.
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Apple rejects net neutrality testing app, says it offers “no benefits to users”

An iPhone application that attempts to detect whether ISPs are throttling online services was rejected by Apple when its developer tried to get it into the company’s App Store.

David Choffnes, a Northeastern University professor who researches distributed systems and networking, built an app called “Wehe” that tests the speeds of YouTube, Amazon, NBCSports, Netflix, Skype, Spotify, and Vimeo. Abnormally low speed results for one or more of those services might, in theory, provide evidence that your mobile carrier is throttling a service.

But as Motherboard reported today, Apple refused to let the app into the iPhone App Store, telling him that “your app has no direct benefits to the user.” Motherboard was able to test a beta version of the app using Apple’s TestFlight platform and provided this screenshot of the application in action:

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Crunch Report | Apple pledges $350 billion investment in U.S. economy

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Apple Temporarily Rerouting Employee Shuttles Due to Ongoing Vandalism

Apple runs several shuttle buses to transport its employees from San Francisco down to Cupertino each day, and recently someone has been attacking those shuttle buses, leading to broken windows.

An employee who spoke to Mashable said that several shuttles have suffered from broken windows, and on an internal email thread, there was speculation that it could be due to “rubber rounds” fired at the buses. There have been at least four reports of broken windows on January 12 and January 16.

Image via Mashable


As a result, Apple began rerouting shuttles starting on Wednesday, adding 30 to 45 minutes to the commute from the city to Cupertino. Employees were informed about the route change on Tuesday night in an email obtained by Mashable.

Due to recent incidents of broken windows along the commute route, specifically on highway 280, we’re re-routing coaches for the time being. This change in routes could mean an additional 30-45 minutes of commute time in each direction for some riders.

As always, the safety of our employees is our first priority. We’re working closely with law enforcement to investigate these incidents and we’ll notify you as soon as the coaches are able to return to the regular route. Thank you for your patience and understanding.

For the time being, Apple shuttles will avoid highway 280 as Apple works with the California Highway Patrol to figure out what’s going on. At the current time, it’s not known what was being used to shatter the windows of the shuttle buses, with the CHP attributing the broken windows to an “unknown object.”

Apple shuttles have, in the past, been the target of protestors frustrated by the tech industry’s impact on affordable housing and the cost of living in the Bay Area.
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Apple rerouting employee shuttles after highway attacks shatter windows on buses during commutes

 In the past week, five Apple commuter shuttles carrying employees to and from the company’s Cupertino offices have been attacked, several sources tell us. Windows on the buses were shattered by what employees are suspecting was a gun being fired at the vehicles. All five incidents took place off highway 280 near Woodside, Calif. The first attack took place Friday evening, with an… Read More

Apple to pay $38 billion in US taxes on overseas cash

Apple announced on Wednesday that it would pay $38 billion in taxes to the federal government as it brings cash earned overseas into the United States. The big payment is the result of President Donald Trump’s tax cut bill, passed last month, which created a new, special tax rate for overseas cash.

Apple is likely to be the biggest beneficiary of that provision. The American company had around $250 billion in cash and other short-term assets held by overseas affiliates. Under previous tax law, Apple would have had to pay a tax of 35 percent in order to bring overseas cash back to the United States. Under the new law, that rate is cut to 15.5 percent, saving Apple tens of billions of dollars compared to what it would have paid to bring the cash home in 2017.

Apple didn’t have a choice about this. Under the new tax bill, all overseas cash is subject to a one-time 15.5 percent tax whether Apple leaves it overseas or moves it to the United States.

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Apple Will Add 20,000 New Jobs With the Money It’s Bringing Back to U.S. Because of Tax Law

(SAN FRANCISCO) — Apple is planning to build another corporate campus and hire 20,000 workers during the next five years as part of a $350 billion commitment to the U.S. economy.

The pledge announced Wednesday is an offshoot from the sweeping overhaul of the U.S. tax code championed by President Donald Trump and approved by Congress last month.

Besides dramatically lowering the standard corporate tax rate, the reforms offer a one-time break on cash being held overseas.

Apple plans to take advantage of that provision to bring back more than $250 billion in offshore cash, generating a tax bill of roughly $38 billion.

The Cupertino, California, company says it will announce the location of a second campus devoted to customer support later this year.