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NEW YORK (Reuters) – Comcast Corp is planning to rebrand and expand a streaming video option for broadband subscribers who do not want to pay for a traditional cable package, sources told Reuters on Monday.

Based on supply chain analysis following a trip to Asia, Susquehanna Financial Group analyst Christopher Rolland (via Barron’s) believes Apple’s third-generation Apple Watch may introduce cellular connectivity, a feature that’s been long rumored for the device.

Specifically, Rolland suggests the 2017 Apple Watch will include a SIM card for LTE connectivity and that the next-generation device will be promoted alongside the AirPods.

We understand a model of the next Apple watch will include a SIM card, and therefore is likely to support LTE. We understand some issues remain, including battery life and form factor size, but significant progress has been made. Apple may be employing VOIP and data across a CAT-M1 connection for superior battery life.

Apple will tout interoperability with the company’s AirPods (now on back order till May) to make and receive phone calls (perhaps a small win for Maxim with amps in each ear bud). Positive QCOM, MXIM.

Apple has likely been working to add a cellular modem to the Apple Watch for several years, but has been unable to do so due to excessive battery drain. In early 2016, rumors suggested the second-generation Apple Watch would include cellular connectivity, but that didn’t pan out.

Mid-2016 rumors indicated Apple was researching low-power cellular chips for future versions of the Apple Watch, but was unable to make it work for the second-generation device, so the technology could potentially be ready for inclusion in a 2017 Apple Watch.

The addition of standalone cellular connectivity would further untether the Apple Watch from the iPhone, a process that started with the introduction of GPS in the Apple Watch Series 2. With a cellular connection, Apple Watch owners would not need an iPhone nearby to do things like make phone calls and stream Apple Music content, but a separate data plan would likely be needed.

Other Apple Watch 3 rumors have pointed towards a modest update that focuses mainly on under-the-hood hardware improvements to boost performance and battery life, and while we haven’t heard much information on a third-generation device, a refresh could come alongside the iPhone 8 in September.

Today’s report from Rolland also touches on some previously mentioned 2017 rumors, suggesting all three rumored iPhone models will feature wireless charging capabilities and will be charged through pads manufactured by Pegatron and Foxconn. “There is some skepticism regarding charging efficiency,” writes Rolland, “as it may take 3 hours to receive a full charge.”

While long-range contactless wireless charging was originally rumored to be included in the 2017 iPhone, later information has centered on inductive charging methods, which would require a separate charging mat or other similar charging device.

The analyst also believes Apple will eliminate the Home button in the iPhone 8, but the Lightning port will stay. He suggests there has been “serious consideration” for removing the Lightning port in 2018, however.

Rolland does not have an established track record for predicting Apple’s product plans, but the information he’s shared today is not outlandish and echoes past rumors. Still, cellular connectivity for the Apple Watch has been rumored multiple times in the past, so it’s worth viewing today’s note with some skepticism until additional information is available.

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Does Elon Musk ever sleep?

Probably. But whatever the amount, it’s likely diminished even more now, as the serial entrepreneur ― already busy with Tesla, SpaceX and Solar City, not to mention The Boring Company and Hyperloop ― has launched another company.

His newest venture, called Neuralink, will research how to connect the human brain and computers by way of tiny, implanted electrodes.

Max Hodak, a company insider at Neuralink, confirmed the news to the Wall Street Journal Monday, describing the state of the startup as “embryonic.”

While Neuralink may be brand new, the concept it hopes to capitalize on is not.

Musk spoke publicly about the idea at Recode’s 2016 Code Conference, describing a need for some sort of “neural lace” to enable direct human/computer interfacing. Without that, he theorized, we risk playing second fiddle to artificial intelligence, a technology liable to advance so quickly it ends up viewing humans as little more than domestic pets (in a best-case scenario).

“I don’t love the idea of being a house cat,” Musk said at the conference. “I think one of the solutions that seems maybe the best is to add an AI layer … A third, digital layer above the cortex that could work well and symbiotically with you.”

Researchers have been actively engaged in the topic as well. A 2015 study in the journal Nature Nanotechnology explained in great detail how an electronic mesh could be injected into the brain via a syringe. Possible early applications of the technology could help treat neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s, or help patients with spinal cord injuries control artificial limbs.

“We’re trying to blur the distinction between electronic circuits and neural circuits,” Charles Lieber, a co-author of the Nature Nanotechnology report and a researcher at Harvard told Smithsonian Magazine at the time. “We have to walk before we can run, but we think we can really revolutionize our ability to interface with the brain.”

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States is considering deepening its role in Yemen’s conflict by more directly aiding its Gulf allies battling Iran-aligned Houthi rebels, officials say, potentially relaxing a U.S. policy that limited American support.

Enlarge (credit: Getty | Joe Raedle)

While facing intense outrage for repeatedly jacking up the price of their life-saving epinephrine auto-injectors, Mylan continually argued that patients were shielded from the soaring list price—thanks to insurance coverage, discounts, and rebates. But a new study looking into insurance claims casts doubt on that defense.

Between 2007 and 2014, the average out-of-pocket spending per insured EpiPen-user jumped 123 percent. During that time, Mylan raised the list price of EpiPens from around $50 per pen to a whopping $609 per two-pack. In 2007, the year Mylan obtained the rights to EpiPen, the average patient spent around $33.8 out-of-pocket for a two-pack. By 2014, the average spending rose to $75.5 per two-pack, according to the new analysis published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The figures don’t square with Mylan’s assurances. The company repeatedly claimed that most most patients weren’t significantly affected by the price hikes and pay only $50 out-of-pocket or less. Reuters reports that Mylan even claimed that about 90 percent of patients paid that little.

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Firefighters battle a deadly fire at an apartment block in Oakland, California.

The Brexit secretary was speaking as key figures from the pro and anti-EU camps clashed on Question Time.

TORONTO — Home Capital Group Inc. (TSX: HCG) has terminated its president and CEO Martin K. Reid, effective immediately.

The Toronto-based mortgage lender made the announcement after markets closed Monday.

“Home Capital requires leadership that can bring to bear a renewed operational discipline, emphasis on risk management and controls, and focus on improving performance,” Kevin P.D. Smith, chair of Home Capital’s board of directors, said in a statement.

Reid, who had been appointed CEO just over a year ago, could not immediately be reached for comment.

The announcement comes as Home Capital finds itself confronting declining stock value and earnings as well as scrutiny from Ontario’s securities regulator.

Last month, the company said it had received an enforcement notice from the Ontario Securities Commission relating to its disclosure in 2014 and 2015 that some loan applications had been falsified and that remedial steps, including the suspension of brokers, have been taken.

Home Capital reported net earnings for the 2016 fiscal year of $247.4 million, down from $287.3 million the year before. Its stock is also down about 20 per cent from a year ago.

Reid has also been removed from the boards of directors of the company’s subsidiaries, including Home Trust.

Bonita J. Then, a member of Home Capital’s board of directors, will serve as interim leader while the company searches for a new full-time replacement.

The Canadian Press