In second day of shutdown, Republicans, Democrats dig in for fight

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republicans and Democrats appeared to harden their positions on Sunday as both sides hunkered down for what could be a prolonged fight, with a U.S. government shutdown in its second day.

Republicans, Democrats dig in for fight as shutdown enters second day

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republicans and Democrats appeared to harden their positions on Sunday as both sides hunkered down for what could be a prolonged fight, with a U.S. government shutdown in its second day.

Democracies will fail if they don’t deal with the fallout of globalisation | Editorial

Democracies will fall under the spell of populists like Donald Trump if they fail to deal with the fallout of globalisation

The rich, as F Scott Fitzgerald noted, “are different from you and me”. Their wealth, he wrote, makes them “cynical where we are trustful” and their affluence makes them think they are “better than we are”. These words ring truest among the billionaires and corporate executives flocking to the Swiss ski resort of Davos this week. The highs recorded by stockmarkets, the tremendous monopoly power of tech titans and spikes in commodity prices reassure the rich cosmocratic class that they have weathered the storm of the financial crisis. The moguls can talk safely about inequality and poverty. But they will do little about it because they do not think their best interests are aligned with citizens. This is a mistake of historic proportions.

Since 2015, Oxfam calculates, the richest 1% have owned more wealth than the rest of the planet. The very wealthy think they no longer share a common fate with the poor. Whatever the warm words at Davos, no company bosses will put their hands up to the fact they play one country against another in order to avoid taxes; no firm will be honest about their attempts to stymie trade unions or about how they lobby against government regulation on labour, environment or privacy that tilts the balance of power away from them and towards the public. The largest western corporations and banks now roam the globe freely. As memories of the financial crisis recede, they are going back to the myth that they are no longer dependent on national publics or governments. Lobbyists for the corporate world claim that markets are on autopilot, that government is a nuisance best avoided.

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Trump campaign ad on murder raises heat in shutdown fight

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump’s presidential campaign on Saturday issued a new video ad calling Democrats “complicit” in murders committed by illegal immigrants, during a government shutdown partly triggered by an impasse over immigration.

As parties battle over shutdown, Trump collects blame on Twitter

(Reuters) – As midnight neared on Friday and the U.S. government barreled toward a shutdown, Republicans and Democrats sought to apportion blame for the deadlock with a battle of social media hashtags.

Trump to Democrats: no immigration talk until U.S. government reopened

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump and Republican lawmakers took a tough stance on Saturday after the U.S. Congress failed to fund federal agencies, saying they would not negotiate on immigration until Democrats help end the government shutdown.

Britain’s tired old economy isn’t strong enough for Brexit | Phillip Inman

Leave campaigners’ visions of national renewal depend on a level of commercial vibrancy that the UK can no longer muster

Brexit, at its heart, is a recognition that Britain has become steadily weaker since it spent much of its empire wealth fighting two world wars – too feeble in the years before the 2016 referendum to sustain an exchange rate of $1.60 and €1.40, just as it was too poor to cope with $4 to the pound in the 1950s and $2 to the pound in 1992.

Manufacturers were unable to make things cheaply, reliably or efficiently enough against the headwind of a high-value currency, forcing many to give up. An economy that boasted 20% of its income coming from manufacturing in the 1980s found it was the source of barely 10% at the beginning of this decade.

Brexit is only something – even if you accept the premise of socialism or free-market bonanza – that works on paper

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Readers’ hopes for 2018: what would you like us to cover this year?

Last week we asked some of our writers to tell us what they hope to cover in 2018. This week we put the question to our supporters


We asked the Guardian’s supporters around the world to reflect on what you hope to make space for in 2018: the causes and values that you want to prioritise, and what you would most like to see our journalism focusing on in the year to come. Here’s what you said.

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