How AI will (and won’t) shape the business of the future

Despite Elon Musk’s warnings this summer, there’s not a whole lot of reason to lose any sleep worrying about Skynet and the Terminator. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is far from becoming a maleficent, all-knowing force. The only “AIpocalypse” on the horizon right now is an overreliance on machine learning and expert systems by humans, as demonstrated by the deaths of Tesla owners who took their hands off the wheel.

What currently passes for “Artificial intelligence”—technologies such as expert systems and machine learning—are excellent for creating software that can help in contexts that involve pattern recognition, automated decision making, and human-to-machine conversations. Both types have been around for decades. And both are only as good as the source information they are based on. For that reason, it’s unlikely that AI will replace human beings’ judgment on important tasks requiring decisions more complex than “yes or no” any time soon.

Expert systems, also known as rule-based or knowledge-based systems, are when computers are programmed with explicit rules, written down by human experts. The computers can then run the same rules, but much faster, 24×7, to come up with the same conclusions as the human experts. Imagine asking an oncologist how she diagnoses cancer, and then programming medical software to follow those same steps. For a particular diagnosis, an oncologist can study which of those rules were activated to validate that the expert system is working correctly.

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We talk about hoofed spiders with the founder of Outlier clothing

 Outlier’s founder Abe Burmeister is a designer who joined the world of clothing manufacturing over five years ago. His clothing – creating with cutting edge fabrics – is touted as high-tech and very chic but what frustrates Burmeister is how slowly the clothing industry is moving. His latest creation, a rolltop knapsack, uses a unique material to create one of the lightest… Read More

We talk about hoofed spiders with the founder of Outlier clothing

 Outlier’s founder Abe Burmeister is a designer who joined the world of clothing manufacturing over five years ago. His clothing – creating with cutting edge fabrics – is touted as high-tech and very chic but what frustrates Burmeister is how slowly the clothing industry is moving. His latest creation, a rolltop knapsack, uses a unique material to create one of the lightest… Read More

Intel Core i9-7960X review: It beats Threadripper, but for a price

Whether the Core i9-7960X was always part of Intel’s plans for the high end desktop (HEDT), or whether it was haphazardly rushed to market to combat AMD’s bullish Threadripper platform, one thing is clear: Intel once again has the fastest slice of silicon on the market. With 16 cores and 32 threads, matching AMD’s flagship Threadripper 1950X, the i9-7960X is an unashamedly over-the-top processor that breaks benchmarking records, and powers through heavy production tasks.

But a processor is more than its raw number crunching prowess. Threadripper raised the bar for HEDT with the rich, consumer-friendly X399 platform, which offers a full set of features without spurious lockouts. More importantly, AMD doesn’t charge through the nose for it. The Threadripper 1950X features 16C/32T and costs £950/$1000. Intel’s Core i9-7900X offers just 10C/20T for the same price. With the exception of gaming, the 1950X is a much more powerful processor.

Unfortunately, despite the strong competition, Intel isn’t yet willing to compete on price. The i9-7960X costs a whopping $1700/£1700—and while it might be faster, it certainly isn’t £700 faster. That’s not to mention that Intel continues to use a weak thermal material to mount its CPU heat spreaders, instead of the superior solder that AMD uses. It makes the i9-7960X a bear of a chip to overclock and noisy at stock without suffering serious thermal issues.

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Intel Core i9-7960X review: It beats Threadripper, but for a price

Whether the Core i9-7960X was always part of Intel’s plans for the high end desktop (HEDT), or whether it was haphazardly rushed to market to combat AMD’s bullish Threadripper platform, one thing is clear: Intel once again has the fastest slice of silicon on the market. With 16 cores and 32 threads, matching AMD’s flagship Threadripper 1950X, the i9-7960X is an unashamedly over-the-top processor that breaks benchmarking records, and powers through heavy production tasks.

But a processor is more than its raw number crunching prowess. Threadripper raised the bar for HEDT with the rich, consumer-friendly X399 platform, which offers a full set of features without spurious lockouts. More importantly, AMD doesn’t charge through the nose for it. The Threadripper 1950X features 16C/32T and costs £950/$1000. Intel’s Core i9-7900X offers just 10C/20T for the same price. With the exception of gaming, the 1950X is a much more powerful processor.

Unfortunately, despite the strong competition, Intel isn’t yet willing to compete on price. The i9-7960X costs a whopping $1700/£1700—and while it might be faster, it certainly isn’t £700 faster. That’s not to mention that Intel continues to use a weak thermal material to mount its CPU heat spreaders, instead of the superior solder that AMD uses. It makes the i9-7960X a bear of a chip to overclock and noisy at stock without suffering serious thermal issues.

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Tesla Model 3 owners are sharing more info on model as deliveries increase

If the past is anything to go by, we expect it might be some time before Tesla has any Model 3 electric cars for us to review. The company’s order books are overflowing, and in the past we’ve seen that any production capacity is prioritized for paying customers rather than the press. But as Model 3s start finding their way into the hands of customers who aren’t Tesla employees, plenty more details about the hotly anticipated car are becoming public, thanks to owners at the Model 3 Owners Club.

Members of the club complied a list of over 80 different features of the car they’re curious about, including questions about how the car operates (does the card unlock all the doors, where does the UI show you that your turn signals are active), physical aspects of the car (what does the tow hitch attachment look like, how much stuff can you fit in the front and rear cargo areas), and subjective details (how aggressive is the energy regeneration, does that wood trim cause glare).

At least two members of the club have received delivery of their cars, and unlike Tesla employees and special friends of the company who have cars, they appear to be under no requirement to keep this info quiet. So far, we’ve learned a few interesting facts. For instance, the windshield wipers are turned on and off by a stalk like just about every other car on the market, but changing the speed (slow/fast/intermittent) is handled by a menu on the touchscreen. The stalk also does double duty turning on the headlights, and there are no rain sensors for the wipers.

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Microsoft finally starts doing something with LinkedIn by integrating it into Office 365

 Last year, Microsoft bought LinkedIn for $26.2 billion, but even though the acquisition has long closed, Microsoft hasn’t yet done much with all of the data it gets from the social network. At its Ignite conference in Orlando, Florida, the company announced some first steps in integrating LinkedIn’s social graph with its Office products. Read More

Microsoft finally starts doing something with LinkedIn by integrating it into Office 365

 Last year, Microsoft bought LinkedIn for $26.2 billion, but even though the acquisition has long closed, Microsoft hasn’t yet done much with all of the data it gets from the social network. At its Ignite conference in Orlando, Florida, the company announced some first steps in integrating LinkedIn’s social graph with its Office products. Read More