Donald Trump Jr. agrees to Senate committee interview: New York Times

Donald Trump Jr. has reached an agreement with the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee for the panel’s senators to interview him in mid-June, the New York Times reported on Tuesday.

Hands-On With the OnePlus 7 Pro’s New Pop-Up Camera and Bezel-Free Display

OnePlus today unveiled its latest flagship smartphone, the OnePlus 7 Pro, which offers an impressive feature set at a price that beats out flagship devices from other smartphone manufacturers, including Apple.

We were able to go hands-on with the OnePlus 7 Pro at the OnePlus event this morning, so we thought we’d give MacRumors readers a look at the bezel-free display and pop-up camera, both of which are great smartphone features.

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The OnePlus 7 Pro is all display, with a 6.67-inch OLED screen that takes up the entire front of the device. There are no camera cutouts or notches on the display at all, and that’s because OnePlus is using a nifty little front-facing camera that pops out of the back of the phone when you want to use it.



It’s a feature that’s unique to the OnePlus device, and it allows for an edge-to-edge top-to-bottom bezel-free display without sacrificing the selfie camera. The little pop out camera seems rather durable, though we’ll have to see how it holds up over time.

OnePlus uploaded a video demonstrating the camera opening and closing more than 300,000 times (it’s 12 hours long!) and another video that demonstrated it lifting up a rock, so it certainly seems to be able to hold up to abuse.



Though it’s got a 6.67-inch display, the OnePlus 7 Pro is similar in size to the iPhone XS Max, just because there’s no bezels to deal with. The display does curve around the edges of the device, which some may not like, but it looks undeniably good.

OnePlus calls the display a “Fluid AMOLED” display because it has a 90Hz refresh rate, a concept similar to the 120Hz refresh rate on the iPad Pro models. That refresh rate is more noticeable on a smaller device, and scrolling through the OS is super smooth.



Aside from the standout display and the unique pop-up front-facing camera, the OnePlus 7 Pro has some pretty decent specs. There’s a triple-lens camera with telephoto, wide-angle, and ultra wide-angle lenses, an under-display fingerprint sensor, a Snapdragon 855 chip, up to 12GB RAM, up to 256GB storage, a 4,000mAh battery, and a fast charging feature.

On the downside, the OnePlus 7 Pro doesn’t offer wireless charging like many other smartphones on the market, nor does it have an Ingress Protection rating for water resistance. And of course there’s one other major downside for Apple fans — it runs Android.



OnePlus is charging more for this year’s flagship OnePlus smartphone, and the 7 Pro is priced starting at $669. That’s still quite a bit cheaper than the iPhone XS and flagship smartphones from other companies like Samsung, even though it’s using some pretty high-end hardware.

What do you think of the OnePlus 7 Pro and the pop-up selfie cam? Let us know in the comments. We’ll be taking a closer look at the OnePlus 7 Pro and comparing it to the iPhone XS Max in a future video, so keep an eye out for that.

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Stocks gain back some ground as investors assess the trade war’s impact

Stocks had their best trading day in a while on Tuesday as investors took a break from selling to assess the actual effects of the trade war with China.

Both the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 gained back some of their losses with the DJIA climbing 207.06 points to close at 25,532.05 and the S&P hitting 2,834.41, up 0.8%. The Nasdaq Composite Index wrapped its trading day at 7,734.49.

Tech stocks like Cisco Systems and Microsoft both rose to lead the way for a sector that could be hit hard by any prolonged trade war between the U.S. and China. Even Apple was up 1.6% on the day after taking a bit of a pummeling as both the U.S. and China announced new rounds of tariffs and import duties.

While some investors are calling the rally more of a dead cat bounce than something that markets can sustain, other investors point out that the fundamentals behind U.S. investing haven’t changed, even as costs are set to rise.

Indeed, economists cited by The New York Times think the tariffs’ gross domestic product in the U.S. will only decline by 0.3 percentage points at most over the long term.

Still, that assessment doesn’t take into account the impact on consumer wallets and consumer confidence should a prolonged trade war and rising prices force everyday Americans to rethink their spending habits.

Even the modest gains from today’s trading don’t recoup all of the losses the markets have suffered since the new round of tit for tat tariffs began when the U.S. walked away from negotiations and imposed new duties on goods.

Former mayor of Lima jailed before trial in Odebrecht probe

A judge on Tuesday ordered Susana Villaran, the former mayor of the Peruvian capital Lima, to 18 months in pre-trial detention in connection with alleged bribes from Brazilian construction companies Odebrecht and OAS.

Saudi Arabia oil facilities attacked, U.S.-Iran tensions flare

Saudi Arabia said armed drones struck two oil pumping stations in the kingdom on Tuesday in what it called a “cowardly” act of terrorism two days after Saudi oil tankers were sabotaged off the coast of the United Arab Emirates.

Google to push new ads on its apps to snare shoppers

Alphabet Inc’s Google will begin featuring ads on the homepage of its smartphone app worldwide later this year, as the search engine expands its advertising real estate to boost revenue from mobile shoppers.

Democrat Warren rejects town hall on ‘hate-for-profit’ Fox News

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren on Tuesday said she was refusing an invitation to participate in a town hall organized by Fox News, calling the American cable news network popular with conservatives “a hate-for-profit racket.”