Rwandan convicted of lying while seeking U.S. asylum after genocide

A Rwandan man who U.S. prosecutors said participated in the African nation’s 1994 genocide was convicted on Friday of lying about belonging to the political party that led the killings in hopes of gaining asylum in the United States.

Liberal group squares off with U.S. Democratic leadership over challenging incumbents

The grassroots group that helped propel U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into Congress is taking on Democratic party leaders over what critics call an effort to deter liberal candidates from running against more moderate incumbents.

VSCO sues PicsArt over photo filters that were allegedly reverse engineered

Photo-editing app-maker VSCO has filed a lawsuit against competitor PicsArt.

The suit focuses on 19 PicsArt filters that were supposedly “reverse engineered from VSCO’s filters,” with VSCO alleging it has become a legal issue involving false advertising and violations of the app’s terms of service.

“VSCO has invested significant time and resources in developing its presets [a.k.a. filters], which represent valuable intellectual property of VSCO,” the company writes.

In a statement, PicsArt denied the suit’s claims:

VSCO is not a direct competitor, but they clearly feel threatened by PicsArt. VSCO’s claims are meritless. It’s disappointing that they have made these false claims against us. PicsArt will vigorously defend itself against these baseless claims and all options are under consideration.

Specifically, VSCO says that at least 17 PicsArt employees created VSCO accounts — probably not an uncommon competitive practice, but the suit claims they used those accounts to reverse engineer the filters, thus violating the terms in which users “agree not to sell, license, rent, modify, distribute, copy, reproduce, transmit, publicly display, publicly perform, publish, adapt, edit or create derivative works from any VSCO Content.”

In addition, the suit accuses PicsArt of engaging in false advertising by describing the filters in its PicsArt Gold subscription as “exclusive” and “only for [PicsArt] Gold users.”

Why is VSCO so sure that the PicsArt filters were based on its own? The suit says:

VSCO’s color scientists have determined that at least nineteen presets published by PicsArt are effectively identical to VSCO presets that are only available through a VSCO account. Specifically, VSCO determined that those PicsArt filters have a Mean Color Difference (“MCD”) of less than two CIEDE2000 units (in some cases, far less than two units) compared to their VSCO counterparts. An MCD of less than two CIEDE2000 units between filters is imperceptible to the human eye and cannot have been achieved by coincidence or visual or manual approximation. On information and belief, PicsArt could have only achieved this degree of similarity between its filters and those of VSCO by using its employees’ VSCO user accounts to access the VSCO app and reverse engineer VSCO’s presets.

The suit goes on to claim that VSCO’s lawyers sent PicsArt a letter in February demanding that the company identify and remove any filters that were reverse engineered or copied from VSCO. The letter also demanded “an accounting of all profits and revenues generated from such filters” and that PicsArt identify any employees who had created VSCO accounts.

In VSCO’s telling, PicsArt then responded that it was “in the process of replacing certain underperforming filters and modifying others,” including the 19 filters in question, but it only removed 17 — and supposedly two of the new filters “were similarly reverse engineered from VSCO’s proprietary presets.” The suit also says PicsArt has failed to provide the information that VSCO demanded.

VSCO does not appear to be suing for a specific monetary value, but the suit asks for “disgorgement of any proceeds obtained from PicsArt’s use of VSCO filters,” as well as injunctive relief, compensatory damages and “the costs of corrective advertising.”

You can read the full complaint below.

VSCO Complaint by on Scribd

Apple May Be Planning to Break Up iTunes With New Music and Podcast Apps for Mac

With the launch of macOS 10.15, Apple may be planning to release separate Music and Podcasts apps for the Mac, according to developer Steve Troughton-Smith.

In a tweet shared this afternoon, Troughton-Smith said that based on evidence he’s discovered, Apple appears to be working on new UIKit-based Music, Podcasts, and Books apps for macOS, all three of which will join the TV app that Apple has said is in the works.

Separate apps for each of these services suggest that Apple is planning to break up the iTunes app for Mac, which is where Podcasts, Movies, and TV Shows are available at the current time. Apple already has a Books app, but an updated version or separate app that includes audiobooks could be in development.



Apple in macOS Mojave introduced the groundwork for cross-platform iOS and Mac apps, and Apple introduced dedicated Mac apps for Stocks, Home, Apple News, and Voice Memos. All of these apps were based on iOS apps, and with new the software coming in 2019, additional iOS apps could be brought to Mac to replace iTunes.



Troughton-Smith has, in the past, shared accurate info on Apple’s plans based on hints and code discovered in current versions of Apple’s operating systems.

Apple will macOS 10.15 alongside iOS 13 at its 2019 Worldwide Developers Conference, which is set to kick off on June 3.

Related Roundup: macOS 10.15

This article, "Apple May Be Planning to Break Up iTunes With New Music and Podcast Apps for Mac" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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