Trump defends intervention to help China telecom company ZTE

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump on Monday defended his decision to revisit penalties for Chinese company ZTE Corp for flouting U.S. sanctions on trade with Iran, saying the telecom maker is a big buyer for U.S. suppliers.

U.S. EPA chief Pruitt asked for 24/7 security from first day: watchdog

(Reuters) – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt requested and received around-the-clock security since his first day in office in 2017, the agency’s watchdog on Monday told a lawmaker questioning Pruitt’s expensive security detail.

NAFTA ‘hot topics’ unresolved as deal deadline looms, says U.S. official Ross

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said on Monday that none of the contentious issues in a new NAFTA trade deal appear to have been resolved, diminishing chances of meeting a Thursday deadline to notify U.S. lawmakers of an agreement.

Netflix exec says 85 percent new spending will go towards original content

In case you had any doubts that original content is a big priority at Netflix, Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos estimated that 85 percent of the company’s total spending is going to new shows and and movies.

That’s according to Variety, which reported on Sarandos’ remarks today at MoffettNathanson’s Media & Communications Summit 2018 in New York. He also said Netflix has a 470 originals scheduled to premiere between now and the end of the year, bringing the total up to around 1,000.

It’s probably not surprising that the service is prioritizing originals. After all, Netflix seems to be highlighting a new original every time I open it up, and competitors like Apple, Amazon and Hulu are ramping up their own spending.

But the depth of Netflix’s library, which is achieved by licensing content from others, has always seemed like a strength — in fact, a recent study found that licensed content generates 80 percent of Netflix viewing in the United States.

Part of the context here is that many of the studios that have sold their content to Netflix in the past are now either saving it for their own streaming services or looking to raise the prices.

And while movies account for one-third of viewing on Netflix, Sarandos pointed to new, big budget titles as one area where it no longer makes sense for the streaming service to spend a ton of money — because if you really want to catch the latest blockbuster, you probably already saw in theaters.

“We said, maybe we can put the billion dollars we’d put in an output deal into original films,” he said.

Sarandos also sees an opportunity to develop more unscripted content like Queer Eye, and to sign big deals with high-profile showrunners like Shonda Rhimes and Ryan Murphy.

Netflix had previously projected that it would spend $7 billion to $8 billion on content this year. And just today, Netflix announced that it’s renewing Lost in Space for a second season (we were fans of season one) and picked up 10 After Midnight, a horror anthology series from Shape of Water director Guillermo del Toro.

iPhone X Camera Compared to LG G7 ThinQ Camera

LG recently released its latest flagship smartphone, the LG G7 ThinQ, which, like flagship smartphones from many other manufacturers, includes a high-quality dual-lens camera that enables impressive photographic capabilities.

In our latest YouTube video, we pitted the G7’s camera against the camera of the iPhone X to compare and contrast the feature set and image quality of the two devices.

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While the iPhone X has a dual-lens setup that includes a wide-angle and a telephoto lens, the G7, like the G6, takes a different approach for its camera setup, introducing both a standard ~71-degree f/1.6 wide-angle lens and an even wider f/1.9 107-degree lens, eschewing telephoto capabilities all together.

Both sensors offer an improved 16-megapixel pixel count, and the standard lens includes support for optical image stabilization and an autofocus system that includes phase detection and laser.

Apple’s iPhone X has a standard 12-megapixel f/1.8 wide-angle lens paired with a 12-megapixel f/2.4 telephoto lens, which is what Apple uses for its Portrait Mode depth effects. Both wide-angle and telephoto lenses have their purposes, and with LG’s setup, you can take wider landscape shots that fit more of the background in rather than closer portrait images designed to focus on a single subject.

LG’s device also includes a portrait mode-style effect, but the background blurring is done entirely via software rather than through lens technology. LG has included a unique “AI Cam” feature that’s designed to analyze the subjects in the photo and offer up recommendations on how to make adjustments for the best possible photo.

The native camera app on the LG G7 has an option for manual operation and several included photographic modes, while taking manual shots on the iPhone X requires you to download a third-party app.

We’ve got some comparison shots of the two cameras below, along with an Imgur album with all of the images featured in the video at a higher resolution:



The LG G7 and the iPhone X are both capable devices that take high-quality photos, so you won’t go wrong with either one of these smartphones.

We largely preferred the look of the iPhone X photos because of its tendency to capture more natural colors and accurately capture images with a lot of variation in lighting without overexposing elements of the photo, but in a lot of cases, the camera you like best is going to come down to personal taste.

What do you think of the LG G7’s camera? Let us know in the comments.

Related Roundup: iPhone X
Tag: LG
Buyer’s Guide: iPhone X (Neutral)

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Russian company charged in Mueller probe seeks grand jury materials

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A Russian company accused by Special Counsel Robert Mueller of funding a propaganda operation to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election is asking a federal judge for access to secret information reviewed by a grand jury before it indicted the firm.

GPU-equipped Ryzen Pros give AMD what it needs to conquer the corporate desktop

AMD has launched a new range of Ryzen Pro processors that gives the company an important new weapon in its competition with Intel.

Last year, AMD introduced Ryzen Pro, a range of processors aimed at corporate desktops rather than consumer systems. Though broadly identical to their consumer counterparts, the Pro chips offer additional guarantees around supply and availability so that corporate fleets can standardize on particular chips without risking a part being discontinued mid-way through their replacement cycle. The Pro chips also carry longer warranties and emphasize certain security and management features that may not be present or enabled in consumer systems.

The first Ryzen Pros had a major omission, however: they didn’t include integrated GPUs. Corporate desktops and laptops, typically used for Office, Web browsing, and other low-intensity tasks, overwhelmingly use integrated GPUs rather than discrete ones; they simply don’t need anything more powerful. The need for separate GPUs meant that the first-generation Ryzen Pros had only very limited appeal in their target corporate market.

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