T-Mobile and Sprint finally, officially, say they definitely won’t merge

T-Mobile USA and Sprint today finally gave a definitive answer about whether they will merge. The telecom giants said that they have stopped negotiating and will remain independent entities. The wireless carriers “were unable to find mutually agreeable terms” and want to “put an end to the extensive speculation around a transaction,” they said in a joint announcement.

Over the past few weeks, numerous merger updates have bubbled up from anonymous sources. Initially, the merger seemed to be a done dealMerger talks then seemed to break down, only to be revived again a couple days ago.

But none of those rumors were confirmed by the companies’ chief executives. That changed today when T-Mobile CEO John Legere and Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure both said that there won’t be any deal.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The smiling, clueless face of capitalism has had a big week | Greg Jericho

Australia shouldn’t get too smug about Donald Trump Jr’s tone-deaf Halloween tweet. We have our own capitalist idiocy

On becoming New Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern said that capitalism was a blatant failure, and in light of the deluded positions taken by proponents of capitalism and free markets this week it is hard not to agree.

Ardern’s comments are revealing in how she framed the question. She suggested, “If you have hundreds of thousands of children living in homes without enough to survive, that’s a blatant failure. What else could you describe it as?”

Related: Donald Trump Jr schooled on Twitter after Halloween ‘socialism’ tweet

Related: If greedy bosses have broken capitalism, who will fix it? | Hugh Muir

Related: Unions seek dramatic pay increases to ensure minimum ‘living wage’

Continue reading…

12 Smart Things You Can Do Right Now To Put Your Brand On Track

This year has been a massive inflection point in marketing and branding. Traditional marketing is irrevocably broken, and the fix starts with some new rules of thumb.

Most scientists now reject the idea that the first Americans came by land

It’s been one of the most contentious debates in anthropology, and now scientists are saying it’s pretty much over. A group of prominent anthropologists have done an overview of the scientific literature and declare in Science magazine that the “Clovis first” hypothesis of the peopling of the Americas is dead.

For decades, students were taught that the first people in the Americas were a group called the Clovis who walked over the Bering land bridge about 13,500 years ago. They arrived (so the narrative goes) via an ice-free corridor between glaciers in North America. But evidence has been piling up since the 1980s of human campsites in North and South America that date back much earlier than 13,500 years. At sites ranging from Oregon in the US to Monte Verde in Chile, evidence of human habitation goes back as far as 18,000 years.

In the 2000s, overwhelming evidence suggested that a pre-Clovis group had come to the Americans before there was an ice-free passage connecting Beringia to the Americas. As Smithsonian anthropologist Torben C. Rick and his colleagues put it, “In a dramatic intellectual turnabout, most archaeologists and other scholars now believe that the earliest Americans followed Pacific Rim shorelines from northeast Asia to Beringia and the Americas.”

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

T-Mobile and Sprint Officially Call Off Merger

T-Mobile and Sprint today announced that plans for a merger have officially ended after the two companies were unable to find “mutually agreeable terms.”

Rumors last week suggested the merger might be called off because Sprint parent company SoftBank was having doubts about the deal over the ownership terms. SoftBank was concerned about “losing control” of the combined company, as T-Mobile parent company Deutsche Telekom wanted a controlling stake.



The two companies allegedly attempted to save the merger by negotiating new terms after Deutsche Telekom submitted a revised offer, but an agreement was not able to be reached.

In a statement, T-Mobile CEO John Legere said a that while a deal with Sprint was “compelling,” it would have needed to offer “significant benefits” for both consumers and shareholders.

“The prospect of combining with Sprint has been compelling for a variety of reasons, including the potential to create significant benefits for consumers and value for shareholders. However, we have been clear all along that a deal with anyone will have to result in superior long-term value for T-Mobile’s shareholders compared to our outstanding stand-alone performance and track record. Going forward, T-Mobile will continue disrupting this industry and bringing our proven Un-carrier strategy to more customers and new categories – ultimately redefining the mobile Internet as we know it. We’ve been out-growing this industry for the last 15 quarters, delivering outstanding value for shareholders, and driving significant change across wireless. We won’t stop now.”

Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure said Sprint had decided that it would be best to move forward alone. Sprint will instead aim to “compete fiercely” in the wireless industry.

“While we couldn’t reach an agreement to combine our companies, we certainly recognize the benefits of scale through a potential combination. However, we have agreed that it is best to move forward on our own. We know we have significant assets, including our rich spectrum holdings, and are accelerating significant investments in our network to ensure our continued growth. As convergence in the connectivity marketplace continues, we believe significant opportunities exist to establish strong partnerships across multiple industries. We are determined to continue our efforts to change the wireless industry and compete fiercely. We look forward to continuing to take the fight to the duopoly and newly emerging competitors.”

This is the second time that T-Mobile and Sprint have failed to reach a merger agreement. Sprint parent company SoftBank attempted to purchase T-Mobile back in 2013 in a deal worth more than $20 billion, but ultimately abandoned its plans in 2014 amid regulatory scrutiny.

Even had the deal succeeded this time around, it’s not clear if it would have gained regulatory approval. Back in 2014, U.S. antitrust regulators said having four national carriers in the United States was important for maintaining a competitive market.

Discuss this article in our forums

Quantifying the driverless startup boom

 For driverless car startups, raising capital seems to happen on autopilot. Investors and acquirers have put billions into the space over the past couple of years in the race for early-mover advantage. They’ve shown no desire to hit the brakes lately either, as indicated by a spate of recent deals. Read More