Protest over ‘torture ship’ docking

Dozens of people protest against the “outrageous” docking of a Chilean naval vessel, dubbed the “torture ship”, in east London.

Egyptian court sentences three Al Jazeera journalists to prison

CAIRO (Reuters) – An Egyptian court sentenced three Al Jazeera TV journalists to three years in prison on Saturday for operating without a press license and broadcasting material harmful to Egypt, a case that has stirred an international outcry.

Jihadist US teen gets 11 years for blog, tweets about crypto and Bitcoin

A 17-year-old high school honor student in Virginia was sentenced to 11 years in prison Friday for conspiring to assist the Islamic State (ISIL), which the US has declared a terror group. Among other allegations, Ali Shukri Amin was charged for assisting ISIL via blog and Twitter posts about encryption and Bitcoin.

“Ali Shukri Amin is a young American who used social media to provide material support to ISIL,” assistant Attorney General John Carlin said in a statement following Friday’s sentencing before US District Judge Claude Hilton in Virginia. “More and more, their propaganda is seeping into our communities and reaching those who are most vulnerable.”

Amin, one of the youngest people in the US to face terror charges, pleaded guilty (PDF) in June and faced a maximum 15 years in prison. The boy founded the @amreekiwitness Twitter handle a year ago, garnering more than 4,000 followers and tweeting more than 7,000 times. Last year, the authorities said, he tweeted on the now-defunct Twitter handle about how jihadists could use Bitcoin “to fund their efforts.”

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Thousands rally in Beirut against political leaders, rot

BEIRUT (Reuters) – Thousands of protesters waving Lebanese flags and chanting “revolution” took to the streets of Beirut on Saturday for an unprecedented mobilization against sectarian politicians they say are incompetent and corrupt.


Baltimore defense lawyers to review nearly 2,000 cases involving stingrays

This week, USA Today‘s investigative team shined a light on the Baltimore police department and their use of stingrays. The paper found cops deployed the cell phone trackers in crimes as minor as harassing phone calls, and the authorities would often conceal the results of that surveillance from suspects and lawyers despite the fact that Maryland law “generally requires that electronic surveillance be disclosed in court,” according to the paper.

Evidently, the story found the right eyeballs. USA Today now reports that defense lawyers in Baltimore have pledged to examine nearly 2,000 cases involving police using stingrays. The lawyers plan to use their findings to approach judges and for “a large number” of criminal convictions to be overturned, the paper writes.

“This is a crisis, and to me it needs to be addressed very quickly,” Baltimore’s deputy public defender, Natalie Finegar, told USA Today. “No stone is going to be left unturned at this point.”

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